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When you were a little kid without a care in the world, you dreamt big about the world. It seemed like a magical place where fantasies would come true and problems didn’t really exist. And boy did your pea-sized brain fire on all cylinders and imagine the endless possibilities. You probably knew exactly what you wanted to do with your life back then because you took some serious interest in random things that just sounded fun. Even as a little kid, you demonstrated passion. But then you grew up and quickly got lost in the shuffle of trying to focus your efforts towards things that seemed fun and cool because the need (or want) for money took over. …


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You’ve heard the age old adage about waking up early. You know, the one about “the early bird gets the worm”. The earlier you wake up, the more opportunities that’ll come your way. Sounds easy enough, but there’s one problem. You hate getting up early. You snooze four times, maybe five, before you process the idea of getting out of bed. It’s one of life’s struggles that it’s so hard to fall asleep and yet also so hard to wake up. …


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Life is like a buffet; it’s never been easier to walk the line and selectively choose the things that grab your attention. And because of this, it’s also never been easier to feel stagnant when you get tired of things. You get bored with jobs, people, and activities, hell even cities. Feeling stuck in life is common, if not only for knowing you have so many options waiting for you.

If you’ve ever had this feeling of being stuck, you know it well. Here’s a scenario of what it feels like: let’s say you’re on a road trip with friends enjoying the hell out of life. It feels like the perfect getaway — you’ve got all your closest buddies with you, no worries to fret over, and plenty of memories in the making. Everyone’s laughing it up, munching on random rest stop snacks, and trading really dumb stories. Like really dumb. …


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Whether you like it or not, where you are right now is the culmination of every past choice you’ve made. There’s a high probability you don’t like where you stand, and so you find yourself ruminating and wondering where you fucked up along the way. So you start reaching back, like way back, to pinpoint where things went haywire. This has a term: it’s called regretting the past.

You can pay me later for that incredible diagnosis.

Unfortunately, regret seeps into just about every facet of your life, and it takes you plus an army of 10,000 soldiers to even attempt to fend it off. You know, just long enough before it comes charging again. That is to say, you really don’t ever get rid of it. …


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Statistics say something like 70% of people are actively disengaged at their job, and another 53% are downright unhappy. That means on average, four out of five of you are spending the majority of your life doing something you either don’t care for or that you loathe. That’s depressing. You’re also pretty average, which means you don’t really have a burning drive to find the success you probably deserve. But on some level, you do want it, because whatever you’re doing right now sucks. Thus, the never-ending stressful struggle on how to find your purpose in life shifts into focus, and it never gets traction. …


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I get a lot of questions from people about how to improve daily self-discipline. It comes in various forms, but most often it’s someone who’s got the two-punch combo: they’re lazy and really desperate. They want a quick fix. They want tips. And they’re hoping one of them will be the game-changer they’ve been missing their entire life. Quora’s a great place to see this in action. It goes something like this:

Question: Hi, what is the one tip (seriously guys, one tip) you’d give to help develop my self-discipline?

Answers: Sir/Ma’am, I got your one tip right here, but first let me lay out 10 other random tips for you. *insert a list of 10 tips that aren’t even useful, from someone that isn’t even…


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You walk into your corporate office job on Monday morning, a cup of strong black coffee firmly squeezed in your hand; the death grip is unmistakeable. You wouldn’t dare let someone take your caffeine from you; you need this sucker to survive. The weekend flew by as usual, and you’re left wondering how you’ve put up with 8 AM conference calls for the last five years straight.

The misery is at an all time high, and you want out of this rat race. Right now, you have about as much energy as a sleepy three-toed sloth. And it never seems to gets better. You fantasize about quitting, down to the unnecessary details of what you’d wear as you walk into your boss’s office to inevitably let them know you’re a replaceable commodity. …


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Follow along here for a sec: imagine you have a friend Ted, and he’s procured an excellent track record at being a complete dick. Like white on rice or a fat kid staring at dessert, he’s lightning quick showing you what an asshole he is. Ted routinely acts out like a two year old in the grocery store checkout line, with temper tantrums and flare ups aimed at making your life miserable.

The only positive thing about Ted? He’s consistent, and so you know the Hot Mess Express is coming full force. Ted sounds like someone you’d hate to have in your corner, for about 1,234 reasons. You’d never want to be friends with someone who treats you like shit and acts like a little kid. Yet Ted is the human equivalent of your ego. He’s a shitty excuse for a human that acts out, just like your ego. No one wants to be friends with an unpredictable asshole. But your ego has enjoyed being at your side for the last 20+ years. It’s time to slap some sanity into your routine and tell Ted you’re sick and tired of his bullshit. …


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It doesn’t take algorithms to realize changing careers is really hard. We cringe at the idea. And the cringing gets worse as the years fly by. If you want to change your career when you’re 30 and beyond, you’ll need all the luck you can get, because it’s really, really hard. But it’s not impossible, and that’s the key differentiator here you might forget. Yet it’s the biggest reason you give up; it just seems too hard and you don’t even want to put up a fight.

Before we get going, let’s take a trip down memory lane here. I want you to think about a cringeworthy time in your life. Like, cringe with intense agony just reliving it in your mind. Something super embarrassing or humiliating. I know you’ve got it in you. Basically, the stuff you shake your head at and hope to never experience in your life again; once was enough, and the sheer thought of it makes you physically want to crawl in a hole and fossilize in a slab of amber. …


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Walking down an incredibly busy street during rush hour kind of sucks. It’s a sight to behold, and not necessarily in a good way. In today’s society, (i.e. a place like New York City or Tokyo, Japan) you feel like a nobody, where thousands of people are sandwiched in one square block. It’s a hot mess. Shoulder to shoulder, you can barely walk. And while everyone, including you, appears pretty muted from the outside, the opposite is true; we’re amped. We’re amped because more than likely, we’re focused on one of the 634,235 problems we have. …

About

Adam Bergen

Chasing the Friday feeling on Mondays | Helping others focus on what’s important | www.mondayviews.com

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