The Venture Capitalist Who Is Both a Man and a Woman
Jessi Hempel
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This is one of the most profound pieces — interview or not — that I’ve read all year. Cyan Banister’s discussion on feeling comfortable in one’s own skin is nuanced and makes me think about gender in ways I hadn’t before.

Though I identify as a straight male, I was never much into the “macho” persona that is/was typical of boys growing up (or was in the late ‘90s)— I’m not overly into gaming, have little interest in cars, and only mildly watch sports from time to time. I spent much of my formative years in high school painting, writing poetry, and exploring other art forms. At the time, it seemed that these interests were considered “less manly” than I think they might be today. Hopefully, attitudes might have changed since then.

In particular, though, one thing I especially love about Cyan’s discussion with you Jessi, is the focus on the concept of diversity, and how it should be expanded out to included more than just binary considerations. We’re all fluid in some aspect of our lives, and this seems to be a good metaphor for how all those fluid dynamics can be acknowledged and accepted. Indeed, it might provide the ideal starting point to begin such a discussion.

Brilliant article, definitely one of my favorite reads lately.

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