Winter Wonderland

“What did you say?”

“Asterism,” she said looking up from her book, “It’s a fancy way of saying a star constellation.”

The other woman, sitting by the window, turned to look at Bookworm across the room, “Have you been reading the dictionary again?”

“Indubitably.”

“That’s what I thought,” Skygazer said. The two of them shared a smile and then returned to what they were doing. Skygazer looking out her window. Bookworm reading her book.

After a while of both of them sitting in silence, Bookworm spoke again, “You probably aren’t going to see any stars tonight, not with all the cloud cover.”

“I’m not looking for stars, silly. I’m looking for snow.”

“It’s the middle of November. Plus, the weatherwoman said we shouldn’t expect snow until late December.”

“Snow is on its way,” said Skygazer, “I can smell it.”

“You can smell it?” Bookworm repeated skeptically.

“It was earlier today,” she shifted her body around to face her, “I smelled snow, and cinnamon, and hot chocolate, and cookies!”

“You’re probably just smelling the French madeleines from earlier. You baked enough of them.”

“My mother loves madeleines,” said Skygazer, “I wanted to be sure she had plenty when she visits tomorrow.”

“Speaking of tomorrow,” Bookworm checked the wall clock, “I have young minds to mold in the morning. Are you coming up?”

“I’ll be up later. Night, night,” Skygazer returned to looking out her window.

“Night, night.”


“Wake up!”

Bookworm was jostled awake by Skygazer. She looked over at the clock on the nightstand, “It’s three.”

“It’s snowing.”

“It’s three o’ clock in the morning.”

“Get up!”

“What?”

“Get up!”

Knowing she would never relent, Bookworm got out of bed and let Skygazer lead her to the bedroom window that overlooked the backyard.

Skygazer had been right. In the four hours that she’d been asleep, there had been a deluge of white snow that covered the whole backyard creating a winter wonderland. Bookworm could see a couple ungulate animals prancing into their neighbor’s backyard.

“Isn’t it beautiful?” Skygazer asked.

As grouchy as Bookworm was at her for being woken up, she smiled, “Yeah, it really is.”

“I’m making hot chocolate.” Skygazer said heading towards the bedroom door.

“You go do that,” Bookworm turned and flopped back onto their bed, “I’m going back to bed. I have to be at the school in five hours.”

“Suit yourself, party-pooper.”

“I will,” and not a moment later, Bookworm was asleep again.

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.