Today’s post is brought to you by Bedlam Coffee in Seattle. It’s an old school 2nd gen coffee shop, kitschy blue collar style, very cool and very endearing. It’s a great place to chill, read a book, hack a little, or generally talk to people in the Belltown Neighborhood. It’s a good part of Seattle and in the back of my mind I have that fear it’ll be replaced by a towering condo complex and a sterile modern steel, wood, and glass something another any minute now. But for the moment it’s a prime spot to get wired into one’s mind.

Post Topics: I’m gonna hit on a number of key topics. Curious your thoughts, and as always, tweet at me via twitter, comment here, or ping me however. Always glad to chat on things.
  • Climate Leave — The second I saw this post, by Anil Dash I immediately had a few thoughts pop into my mind. The first is all companies should start recording this climate leave data point so we can have hard data on what the climate catastrophe is costing companies in hard dollar terms. It’s a way to wake up some people’s thinking to the reality of these extremities and make climate change measurable in ways they’re currently unwilling, unable, or outright refusing to accept or address. On the other side, this is a hard reality of work and life today. For instance, the regularity in which northwest cities shut down over a little snow is frequent now. But it’s only because for many decades west coast cities have existed and not prepared for such, because such just didn’t happen with regularity. So many initial thoughts, and the post itself is really good and inspires additional thinking, as one often may assume from writing Anil tends to do.
  • The difference in JVM vs CLR worlds is quite interesting states Bart Sokol. He inquired with a 280 character tweet, which I’d love to see others weigh in on how this is perceived and played out for you.
Bart inquiring to the reasoning of JVM and CLR culture progress differences.
  • An overheard Oracle conv thread from yours truly happened today too. I just can’t even start with Oracle, everytime I see their tooling in play or discussed, it’s almost always followed by a giant trash fire. The company owns so much and has so much potential to do good but instead all they do is spread horrid reputation, trash systems that could help people, and fall down on their job (i.e. go check out the Oregon health care trash fire they supposedly *built*. Not to release Oregon Gov from some responsibility, but they brought in Oracle with the idea that they knew what they were doing and they ruined the project and basically sucked the project dry of funds, leaving Oregonians without in the end).
My rant thread and call out to Oracle on their sales behaviors.
  • The Former CEO of Brightcove took the rather broken tax plan of the current GOP (or whatever oddball ghost of the GOP it is) to task. It’s a fairly solid write up of the whole matter. It leads to lots of other things one might want to look into if you’re curious about the matter.
  • In a post that I can truly relate with, M.G. Siegler heads north on the Coast Starlight and wrote a nice piece about traveling by train. Why it’s as wonderful as it is, not particularly because of the train itself but what the train provides. To note, Siegler is formerly of Google Ventures, wrote for TechCrunch and VentureBeat among others and has a pretty well connected line with the tech industry. He’s a good person to follow and read.
  • In other news, David Mytton (who got a follow on Medium and Twitter out of this post!) and team at Server Density has finished a 9 month project to migrate from Softlayer to Google Cloud. Similar to efforts I helped kick off at Home Depot and am helping others do. If you’re interested in help around migration of systems; onsite or offsite, co-location or otherwise, to Google Cloud, AWS, or Azure reach out and let me know. I’d love to talk shop about your progress and if Pelotech or I could provide a helping hand. We’ve got a lot of experience in those efforts!
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