On the tail end of my Bootcamp journey, I look at my previous, current, future code and myself in a different way.

React.js logo
React.js logo
You can be a sweet dreeeam, or a beautiful nightmare.

I am currently on the cusp of week eight of nine of bootcamp at Juno College in Toronto, and the last 2 weeks have transformed the way I approach both my code and my view of the world. Weeks six and seven saw us learning the React.js, a JavaScript library/framework created and maintained by the developers at Facebook. React helps us break up our code into reusable chunks called components which help streamline the creation of single and multi-page apps. React makes use of the concept of state to track changes in the app in response to user interaction. …


black text reading 44 hours and 44 minutes
black text reading 44 hours and 44 minutes
DISGUSTENG.

44.4 hours to be exact.

According to WakaTime — a free extension many in web development use to track the amount of hours spent coding per project — I had spent 44.4 hours (aka legal overtime) last week coding, 36 of them on one project. I was amazed. I was appalled. Above all, I was EXHAUSTED. According to Jaden Smith, son of Will Smith and the unsung voice of Generation Z:

Image for post
Image for post
The Sage has spoken.

Little did I know or realize, Jaden was right. The more time I spent trying to please my employers, my family and friends, and the Real Housewives of every city imaginable, I was a walking zombie. I was cramming way, way, too many things into the little time I had available, and living life wracked with guilt when I took time to rest or slow down. While I felt as though I had a “purpose” and I was being “productive” and sharing the minutia of my daily “grind” to all 550 followers on Instagram (I’m practically an influencer, didn’t you all know?), …


neon signage of a human figure with a brain on a black background
neon signage of a human figure with a brain on a black background
Photo by Bret Kavanaugh on Unsplash

“I don’t want to be a doctor. Or a nurse. Or engineer. Or anything in a hospital.”

These words are every African parent’s worst nightmare. I laugh now, but back in high school when I broke this seemingly benign truth to my parents, this was akin to admitting I wanted to join the circus and mow the lawn with my teeth. See, my parents came to Canada in the late 80's- early 90’s from Ghana, a country in West Africa . Many children of parents from there often joke about the pervasive expectation that we were put on earth to become doctors, lawyers, or engineers. If you didn’t like those you became a nurse. …

About

Afua Deborah

wide-eyed, fast-walking coder.

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