Parents Lie


Parents lie to their children.

All.

the.

time.

If we grew up in a world where complete honesty was acceptable (or even possible), then our childhoods would’ve been quite different.

Just picture a mother, gazing tenderly into her child’s eyes:

“No, honey, there is no such thing as Santa… or the Easter bunny.”

Brutal honesty is painful- for those giving it and those receiving it.

Why then do parents lie? For the benefit of their children. Do you remember the first lie you ever caught your parents in? Surely their intentions were pure…right?

Perhaps your parents didn’t outright lie, but told you one of these common, seemingly harmless half-truths:

“Stay in school — don’t smoke — go to college — work hard: then you’ll be successful.”

All parents say such things for the betterment of their children. But society conveys a different narrative.


Society speaks thus: It’s not about how educated or hardworking you are. How well spoken. How original or creative. It’s not even about how attractive you are.

It is about how much noise you make, and whether that noise has entertainment value.

Just look at the Kardashian’s and Hilton’s of the world. Reality TV personalities, socialites, and the like are fetishized by the media, and then by our children. Who can blame them? Parents can be loud. But the media is louder, and more pervasive.

Want to be rich? Famous? Loved? Idolized? Immortalized?

Make a sex tape.

Thank goodness our youth eschews the filthy lies their parents tell them. Embrace the “dude-bro” mentality. Give in to “basic bitch” syndrome, and you’re sure to go places, kid.


Just keep in mind, that place may be rehab.

The sad fact is, both narratives exist. Both are equally real and equally true. It’s all a matter of how you define success.

Are you after those fifteen fleeting minutes of infamy? Become part of the basic bitch pandemic! Just make sure you’re more basic and more bitch than the millions of others out there, or you’ll never stand out in the ocean of oversexualized, dehumanized young women.

Do you want sustained and meaningful success — on your own terms, not as defined by the whims of society?

Then, in the words of Britney Spears, “You better work, bitch.”


The world is not run by reality TV stars. Cancer will not be cured by amassing Twitter followers. If you want to make the world better for generations to come, then build a solid foundation.

Get an education. Hone your craft. And don’t be afraid of hard work.

Parents don’t lie. They just want you to aspire to be something greater than a socialite, whatever the hell that is…

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