Tourism in Turkey

Turkey is a former home of sultans and hometown of the famous writer, Elif Shafak. It is a semi-arid region that is full of out-of-the-world sites for you to see. Some sites are its cities Istanbul and Cappadocia that are known for their beautiful wind-carved landscapes and strong winds. Istanbul real estate market is considered one of the best and profitable real estate markets in the region due to its excellent strategic location and facilities.

The initial concerns of every tourist are where would they stay, where would they eat and where would they go for sightseeing. The best option for staying could be Argos that is located on an on-site ancient monastery and the rooms are restored from the remains of underground caves and tunnels. It is a mixture of modern and village look but it is so amazing!

Next, a few places where you can eat are Sakli Konak Restaurant, Seyyah Han, and FD Fidan Doner. They will help you relieve you of your hunger pangs.

Whether you’ve put your house for sale in Turkey or you want to invest in Istanbul real estate market, you’ll find many lucrative offers with the best locations in the city. Moving on, the places you could go? Well, the list is abundantly long but here are a few options:

  1. Aya Sofya

The Aya Sofya (formerly the Hagia Sophia), through its conversion to a mosque to its further conversion into a museum in the 20th century, has remained one of Istanbul’s most cherished landmarks.

2. Topkapı Palace

First built by Mehmet the Conqueror in the 15th century, the vast complex is a dazzling display of Islamic art, with lavish courtyards lined with intricate hand-painted tilework, linking a warren of sumptuously decorated rooms, all bounded by battlemented walls and towers. Of the many highlights here, the most popular are the Harem; the Second Court, within which is the vast Palace Kitchens and the Imperial Council Chamber; and the Third Court, which contained the sultan’s private rooms. The Third Court also displays an impressive collection of relics of the Prophet Muhammad (PBUH) in the Sacred Safekeeping Room and is home to the Imperial Treasury, where you’re greeted with a cache of glittering gold objects and precious gems.

3. Blue Mosque

Blue Mosque was built between 1609 and 1616 and created an uproar throughout the Muslim world when it was finished as it had six minarets (the same number as the Great Mosque of Mecca). The mosque gets its nickname from its interior decoration of numerous İznik tiles.

4. Basilica Cistern

This huge, palace-like underground hall, supported by 336 columns in 12 rows, once stored the imperial water supply for the Byzantine emperors. Many of the columns used in construction were recycled from earlier classical structures and feature decorative carvings. The most famous of these are the column bases known as the Medusa stones in the northwest corner of Basilica Cistern.