SDLC

  • When the requirements are constant and not changed regularly.
  • A project is short
  • When resources are well prepared and are available to use.
  • Simple to implement also the number of resources that are required is minimal.
  • The requirements are simple and they remain unchanged during the entire project development.
  • The start and end points for each phase are fixed, which makes it easy to cover progress.
  • The risk factor is higher and not suitable for complex projects.
  • Cannot accept the changes in requirements during development.
  • It becomes tough to go back to the phase. If there is any change in requirement, it is difficult to go back and change it.
  • A product owner makes a prioritized wish list known as a product backlog.
  • The scrum team takes one small piece of the top of the wish list called a sprint backlog and plans to implement it.
  • The team completes their sprint backlog task in 2–4-week period. They progress in a meeting called a daily scrum.
  • The Scrum Master keeps the team focused on the goal.
  • At the end, the work is ready to show. The team closes the sprint with a review, then starts a new sprint.
  • Customers, developers and testers constantly interact with each other.
  • Working software is delivered frequently.
  • Regular adaptation to changing circumstances and even late changes in requirements are welcomed.
  • Some software deliverables, especially the large ones, are difficult to assess the effort required at the beginning of the software development life cycle.
  • There is a lack of necessary design and documentation.
  • The project can easily get taken off track if the customer representative is not clear what final outcome that they want.

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