You ever hear of a rich person paying an NSF fee? $35 for bouncing a $6 check.
That’s an amazing analogy.
Mark H
51

I have a funny not funny story about Wells Fargo.

One of their tricks is rearranging the order of your transactions to maximize overdraft fees. One day I went to check my account and I was over 200 dollars overdrawn. I had been keeping track and knew I was close to overdrawing but shouldn’t have, from my check registry…which I filled out in order of purchase ( all debit/credit, no actual checks, so everything immediately showed on the account even if just as pending ), actually overdrawn..

I had even been following my acct online.

So, curiously, the transaction order had been changed. Which caused a chain reaction of overdraft fees for smaller transactions.

The funny thing was if you took out the fees, I wasn’t actually overdrawn. The amount of my overdraft fees alone was actually more than I was overdrawn, meaning that I couldn’t have been overdrawn when the first fee was charged.

How clever of them.

It kills me the way credit and debt works. The more you have, the more they allow you ( credit). And the more you have, the more ways they find to increase it (debt).

The poorer you are, the more they charge you to participate in life.

It’s got no basis in logic.

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