Photo by Jakob Owens on Unsplash

Generative Art in a Recorded World

Advantages of infinitely long artworks when “content is king”

Alex Bainter
9 min readJun 10, 2019

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My life is made up of many obsessions. Be it an artist, YouTube channel, TV show, music, or even an animal, when I find something that interests me, I can’t stop myself from consuming as much of or about it as possible, as quickly as I can. I focus my consumption on my obsessions to the exclusion of anything else, and this can last weeks or years. If I run out of content before my obsession is over, I start reconsuming material.

Right now, I’m obsessed with Gary Vaynerchuk. Vaynerchuk is a polarizing entrepreneur who, in addition to running his companies, has hired a team of content creators to constantly follow him and record his every move. “Team GaryVee” then edits the audio and video recordings into digestible clips and compilations perfectly tailored to the platforms they’re posted to, like YouTube, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and SoundCloud. I’m not sure I like him, but for some reason, I currently find Gary Vaynerchuk fascinating.

Vaynerchuk runs a digital marketing agency, and readily gives advice on strategies for social media. If the marketing department of the company you work for decided to create a podcast in the last three years and you’re scratching your head wondering who the hell they think is going to listen to it, it’s because “GaryVee” told them to do it.

Vaynerchuk’s thesis is simple: the radio was replaced by the television, and now the television is being replaced by the smartphone. The way people spend their time is shifting. Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook are the new NBC, CBS, and ABC. The end.

If you agree, you understand why it’s an incredible opportunity for everyone: content distribution channels are more democratized than ever. Compare the difficulty of getting a show to air on TV or radio to the unbelievable ease of uploading it to YouTube or a digital podcast distributor. Imagine trying to convince a record label to sell your music, then appreciate that you could record yourself farting for 20 minutes, upload it to a distribution service, and listen to it on Spotify a few days later. (FYI, that’s a referral link. Also please don’t upload your farts to Spotify—we already have Eminem’s music on there).

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Alex Bainter

A web developer creating audio/visual experiences both digital and not. Currently making generative music at Generative.fm.