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Trying to figure out why your side lost an election is never fun and never easy, but they are some of the most important bits of analysis any political observer can do. When Donald Trump won in 2016, the question everyone — left, right, and center — asked was why?

If there was one explanation that gained credibility with all sides it was that Hillary Clinton voters lived in a bubble. Even SNL mocked the idea of liberal bubbles after that election. 2016 was proof that the Democratic Party had lost touch with Americans who live outside of the political, economic, and cultural power centers of this country. …


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Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley plans to object during the counting of the electoral votes in Congress on January 6. He also wants to be president.

Hawley’s December 30 announcement is nothing more or less than a cynical and naked attempt to grab power. Hawley knows full well that there is zero percent chance that Donald Trump is sworn in for a second time on January 20 and that Sen. John Thune is correct when he says that the challenge “would go down like a shot dog.” …


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After President Trump pardoned some corrupt associates on Wednesday including Paul Manafort, Roger Stone, and Charles Kushner, Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse put out a simple, six word statement, “This is rotten to the core.”

You would think that people who have spent the last several years wanting Republicans to stand up to Trump would applaud Sasse’s comments, but many of those people responded quite differently. They accused Sasse and others of being enablers over the past four years and if Sasse really believed this, he had his opportunity to remove Trump during impeachment and declined to take it.

This is all rather silly. Trump’s pardons of the above mentioned individuals is not bad because Trump did, they would be bad if someone who was a more traditional president did them, and impeachment is a non-sequitur. …


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“I can be part of the ‘Surrender Caucus’ or I can fight for our country,” so said Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks on Tuesday as prepares for a January 6 fight to contest the results of the Electoral College that he has exactly a zero percent chance of winning.

Let’s rewind.

Before Donald Trump even announced his intention to seek the Republican nomination, the Republican base was grumbling and ready to erupt at its party establishment.

In 2008, John McCain was the Republican nominee. He was everything that establishmentarian conventional wisdom wanted in a nominee. A statesmen with lots of experience, someone who had served his country in war, and a moderate who could appeal to independents. …


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A meme, according to Richard Dawkins who coined the term in 1976 in The Selfish Gene, is something that “conveys the idea of a unit of cultural transmission.” For Dawkins anything could be a meme, a more simplistic definition might be that a meme is anything that becomes popular.

For an atheist like Dawkins, God, or the concept of God, is a meme. Someone, somewhere, at some point in time needed to find a way to explain things and the idea of God or gods did the job. That first story-teller then told others and those people told other people and all the while people told their children about God and those people grew up and told their children all while people created music and other forms of “great art” in a process that all the way up until present day. …


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From one American perspective, the Cold War was a necessary endeavor to prevent the Eurasian land power — the Soviet Union — from dominating Halford Mackinder’s world island. This was done by being the offshore sea power that could balance Soviet power, while preserving the American economic and trading system, and keeping the threat “over there.”

Another perspective was that after World War I, the United States failed to join the League of Nations, which doomed that organization to impotence and that impotence led to World War II. …


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Joe Biden has started to announce his cabinet and has started with the most important diplomatic and national security posts, Secretary of Defense, which will probably go to Michele Flournoy, not withstanding. While most of his selections have been typical for an establishment Democrat, one selection — climate envoy to-be John Kerry — stands out for all the wrong reasons.

John Kerry represents everything that is wrong with Washington. He is the Ivy League elite who has managed to fail his way upward to some of the most important positions in government. After failing to become president in 2004, he won the chairmanship of Senate Foreign Relations Committee in 2009. From there he went on become Secretary of State where he negotiated a nuclear deal with Iran that enriched that country while allowing them to slow-walk their way to a bomb. Time will tell if Biden can negotiate a better, more encompassing deal that wins support from Republicans, the Israelis, and the Arabs, but if he does, he will have Trump’s sanctions to thank for giving him the leverage to do that. …


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There has been much talk in recent days about the negative effects that the Trump campaign’s futile (and, at times, downright disgraceful) strategy of never-ending legal battles to contest the recent election. While that talk is mostly correct, an under-discussed side effect is that it risks hampering conservatism going forward.

This is not to say the Republican Party risks being dragged down with Trump’s sinking ship. The GOP did quite well in House and Senate races and in a two-party system, the rumors of one party’s demise are always greatly exaggerated. But conservatism and the GOP are not necessarily the same thing. …


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The 2000 Electoral College Map

Glenn Kessler of the Washington Post thinks this election is a mess and therefore wonders if the Electoral College is sustainable. In a multi-tweet thread, he wonders, “Is the Electoral College sustainable when Trump fights to overturn the results in a handful of states, in a vain hope to win, even though he lost the popular vote by more than 5 million votes? Bush in 2000, by contrast, only barely lost the popular vote.”

Later he adds, “The Electoral College has many advantages and served the country well. …


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Will Donald Trump run again in 2024? The speculation has already begun.

Joe Biden will be the next president of the United States, but who will be the Republican nominee in 2024? There are already reports that Donald Trump will try to pull a Grover Cleveland and run again. Then there’s Ron DeSantis, but what about Kristi Noem, who has made a name for herself in recent months? Of course, there’s also Nikki Haley and Larry Hogan has floated a trial balloon or two.

If this all seems ridiculous, that is because it is. In 2020, Elizabeth Warren, after forming an exploratory committee on December 31, 2018, formally announced on February 9, a full year before Iowa and 21 months before the general election. …

About

Alex Christy

Writing about politics and other interesting things. Contributing Writer to NewsBusters. Member of YAF’s National Journalism Center’s Spring 2019 class.

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