Let’s start with an example.

Imagine I want to share two related photos on Twitter.

Apple native Photos app

Turns out I can’t. Not from iOS Photos app.

It is possible within dedicated Twitter app, though.

Twitter app. Attaching multiple photos to a tweet.

Same device, same goal. Can be achieved in one app, can’t be achieved in another.

I could guess the possible reasoning for this, but no excuse is OK for companies the size of Apple and Twitter when it comes to sharing a couple of pictures in the year 2016.

That’s just an example, but you hopefully get the problem.

The main thing leading to frustrations like this (albeit small) is slow and uneven feature support coverage Twitter has across platforms.

Here’s tumblr, multiple photos sharing from Photos app works

It probably just came up in one of those product team planning meetings as ‘Nah, multiple photos sharing from Photos app is a secondary feature, let’s put that way down into the backlog.’

One could blame the team that doesn’t scale fast enough to propagate new features to the broadest set of platforms and applications or blame the very fact that one and the same basic feature needs to be recreated multiple times within one OS.

What would help here is an enabler for technology such as this one.

Twitted engineering team could just connect to an ‘enabler’ that makes multiple photos posting possible everywhere. Done. That shouldn’t be Twitter core business, but that of Apple iOS team.

There better be more enablers out there that would give access to rich OS capabilities and ensure powerful app usage when users are outside of the app.

Skitch app
Skitch that is launched from Photos’ app photo edit mode

Creation of iOS app is hard on its own. Creating adaptations for a variety of other modules of Apple platform is a task that’s hard to pull off even for Twitter. And that’s just one OS.

We might just be early days with tapping into app capabilities without launching the actual app, but OS designers and app designers should strive to enable same rich experience no matter where a person started their task.

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