Book List

My sister said that I ought to put up a list of the best books I’ve ever read. I’ve read a tremendous amount of books. 120 in 2016. I’m on pace for about 100 in 2017. Here it is:

  • Accidental Superpower — insanely good read on geopolitics
  • Absent Superpower — updated geopolitics after the 2016 elections
  • Poor Charlie’s Alamanack — insanely good wisdom
  • Debugging: The 9 Indispensable Rules for Finding Even the Most Elusive Software and Hardware Problems — only book on debugging you’ll need to read
  • Money Masters
  • All of Buffett’s letters
  • New Money Masters
  • Tools of Titans — so many great life hacks here
  • Pleasure of Finding Things Out — anything by Feynman is great
  • Flowers For Algernon — really sad book!
  • Shoe Dog — pretty great business book
  • Meditations — practical Stoicism written by a Roman emperor
  • A Man For All Markets — about a nerd winning it big in life
  • How to Fail at Everything and Still Win Big — life wisdom
  • Art of the Deal — pretty hilarious reading from Trump
  • Snowball — Buffett is an incredibly inspirational life figure
  • Extreme Productivity — the section about how to ‘read’ is really great
  • Your Brain At Work — learning how your brain operates always gives great productivity ideas
  • Hard Things about Hard Things — this book is more for CEOs/startups. But it’s really great. It’s basically war stories about managing people.
  • Effective Engineer — this is great reading for fresh grads about software engineering
  • How To Read A Book — how to read! Really good.
  • Everything Store — incredibly inspirational book about Amazon.
  • The Box — really great history about containers, shipping industry, and globalization. Ties in well with Zeihan’s geopolitics book.
  • Benjamin Franklin — Franklin’s one of those great inspirational historical figures we all ought to learn from.
  • Pre-suasion — tons of great psychology we can learn from the great Cialdini.
  • Unwritten Laws of Engineering — the author’s not actually a software engineer, but I believe…mechanical, or electrical engineering? Anyway, the book is about the human aspect of engineering. Really great read. If I were managing a software team, I’d give this book out to all the employees and fresh grads.
  • Ten Commandments for Business Failure — learn what not to do. Highly rec’d by Gates and Buffett. The hardest thing in business are usually the people problems.
  • What every body is saying — probably the one book you should read about body language. There’s nothing better.
  • Sam Walton: Made In America — Taleb said that “everytime a risk taker writes a book, you should read it. And to be safe, read it twice.” Yep. Read it! I love inspirational historical figures.
  • Zero to One — if you want to found a startup, you should basically read this book immediately.
  • What do you care about what other people think? — Feynman book. ‘Nough said.
  • The Power of Habit — the anatomy of a habit. Really formed my thinking about how to engineer habits.
  • Thinking, Fast and Slow — books about psychology are super fundamental. Psychology goes into every aspect of your life. This book by Kahneman provides even more insight into your brain.
  • The Design of Everyday Things — looking at the world from a design perspective. This book helped me when designing software tools for myself to use.
  • High Output Management — if you’re looking for a book on how to manage people, this is it. That reminds me…
  • Creativity Inc. — really great book on how Catmull manages creativity at Pixar, and how those principles successfully transferred over to Disney Animation.
  • Growing a Business — this explains how to grow a business “Ben & Jerry” style. Which reminds me…
  • Joel Spolsky’s Strategy letters. They’re really good reads about business strategy.
  • Influence — another great book on psychology. Highly recommended by Munger and others. Practically every great thinker nowadays recommends this book.
  • 10/2/2017 — Antifragile, Black Swan, Fooled By Randomness — I think these books are just fantastic. There is actually so much life wisdom contained in these books. There are some who complain about the tone being abrasive, or the whole book being like a ‘rant’, but I think the insights here are way deeper than it seems. And it’s not theoretical, but I actually found many practical applications like how to innovate (overcompensate in frustration), how to maintain health efficiently (max-rep).

Sorry this wasn’t that organized! I basically went through my “Books I read in 2017, 2016” list and picked out the ones I thought were really good.