Toilet Stall Hardware Options

Purchasing your toilet partitions, is a task that most people could care less about. They are the smallest part of your project so you don’t want to put a lot of effort into them. However, you do need to make a few choices to ensure the partitions are going to suit your needs.

First decision is material (refer to my other articles for information), Second decision is the style (again refer to other articles for these details) third decision is the hardware. Hardware you ask? Yes, well there are different types of hardware for different types of applications.

Standard hardware: This hardware consists of stirrup brackets, wrap around hinges, surface mount latch, emergency access. With this hardware you will have ½" gaps around the doors, and at the wall connections. This is standard because this is the default the toilet partitions comes with, and it is the most common hardware. The material of the hardware depends on the material of your toilet partition (metal, stainless steel is chrome, plastic laminate, phenolic, polymer is stainless steel)

Continuous hardware: This hardware consists of full height channels at all connects eliminating gaps, and a full height hinge minimizing the gaps at the doors. This is an upgraded hardware and needs to be asked for. It is meant for applications where you do not want any gaps at connections. Generally, higher traffic washrooms, or washrooms where the gaps would be at a sightline — meaning someone washing their hands would be directly in line with the person using the toilet.

No Sightline Hardware/Gapless hardware: This is the top of the line hardware. It goes along with the full height hardware, except it includes a gapless strip at the door, therefore there are 0 gaps on the doors. In my opinion, these belong on change cubicles, shower stalls, or high traffic public change rooms or washrooms. A standard restaurant or night club wouldn’t need this upgraded hardware, in my professional opinion.

Extra height doors/panels: A standard door and panel are 58", as an upgrade they also come in increased sizes — which ever size you would like to a maximum of 72". These would be a great upgrade again if you are in a change room, nobody can look over a cubicle that is 6" (well, most people) or in any environment where privacy needs to be increased for customer comfort ability. Keep in mind, when increasing to the extra height doors/panels you have to increase to the continuous hardware, standard hardware would not be strong enough to hold the extra weight. You want a safe application, not one where there could be issues.
In summary, review the hardware carefully to determine which is best for your application. Don’t just go with the highest or lowest based on price: Determine which is best for you based on your needs and your customer needs

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