Is Open Adoption Right for You?

Photo retrieved from http://www.esserlawoffice.com/blog/2013/10/28/openness-adoption-means-works/

There are several questions you should ask yourself when contemplating putting your child up for adoption. Do you want to choose your child’s adoptive parents? Do you want to interact with your child through photos and visits? Do you want your child to know about their birth family and history? If so, open adoption is the right choice for you and your child. Open Adoption is a form of adoption that allows birth parents to know and have contact with the adoptive parents and the adopted child. Depending on the openness of the adoption, birth parents are able to have physical contact with their child throughout their entire lives or they are able to stay connected through pictures and emails. These types of open adoptions are defined as fully open adoption and semi-open adoption. Unlike previous generations, “open adoption is now widely accepted as more compassionate and enlightened then secretive adoption” (Understanding Open Adoption, 2015). People no longer look at open adoption in a negative light, but rather embrace it as something beautiful. Through open adoption, birth parents are better able to cope with the decision of placing their child up for adoption. They understand that they will be able to still be part of their child’s life, whether it is through letters or visits. If you were to place your child up for adoption wouldn’t you want to know that they are happy and loved? Wouldn’t you want to know what they look like? Studies show, adolescence want to know about you. “95 percent of adoptees who were surveyed expressed a desire to be found by their birth parents” (Birth Family Search). 72 percent of adopted adolescents wanted to know why they were adopted, 65 percent wanted to meet their birth parents, and 94 percent wanted to know which birth parent they looked like. There are questions that can only be answered through open adoption. If 95 percent of adoptees want to be found by their birth parents, why wouldn’t you want to strongly consider open adoption? Children in open adoptions are better able to understand what adoption is and why they were placed up for adoption in the first place (Understanding Open Adoption, 2015). They understand that they were placed up for adoption out of love and selflessness, not because they were unwanted. They do not have to spend years looking and wondering where they came from. Children in open adoptions know who they are, who their birth parents are, and who their adoptive parents are.

Furthermore, it is important that biological and adoptive parents remember that open adoption is about meeting the needs of children, not adults (Understanding Open Adoption, 2015). So, what do you think is best for adopted children? Open adoption or closed adoption? Why?

Photo retrieved from http://www.spence-chapin.org/domestic-adoption/

Retrievd From:

Birth Family Search. (n.d.). Retrieved September 22, 2016, from http://statistics.adoption.com/information/adoption-statistics-birth-family-search.html

Could Open Adoption be the Best Choice for You and Your Baby? Retrieved September 22, 2016, from https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubPDFs/openadoption.pdf

Newland Carney, E. (2015). Understanding Open Adoption- Pros and Cons. Retrieved September 22, 2016, from http://www.adoptivefamilies.com/openness/understanding-open-adoption/

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