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I’ve had the opportunity to speak to students over the past few months about my career path and how I got into developing apps and games. The catalyst for me, the thing that made me consider programming as a career, was a 90s PC game called Creatures, and the furry little Norns that existed within the world of Albia.

The year was 1997 and I was fourteen years old. I’d picked up a copy of a computer gaming magazine, and there was a double-page review of a game called Creatures. It sounded so strange, and intriguing, and I re-read the…


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I love mornings. Proper early mornings.

Apparently, at least amongst my friends and co-workers, that makes me a little unusual.

I love being up and about whilst the rest of the world is still asleep. It’s the time of the day that feels like my time. It’s the time of the day that I’m most productive, less distracted, focussed, and full of energy.

The downside is that I’m better at everything in the morning.

I exercise in the morning and — using the data my fitness band provides me with — my morning runs are measurably more effective than when…


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When we visit schools to run our Coding Workshops or when I present at TeenTech events, I’m always struck by how universally enjoyed they are, and how excited all the pupils get about spending the day building some cool apps and games. I see them playing their games over break and lunch, showing their creations off to their friends. I put this engagement down to how inclusive the subject matter (apps, games, and devices) is. At the start of each session, I ask the students about the technology and the devices, apps and games they use. I’ve never seen a…


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It’s been a really busy 12 months travelling all over the UK running my Coding Workshops for Schools as well as running the Innovation Zone at TeenTech Events. It’s one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever done and I’m looking forward to getting back out there in October.

The one thing that has seriously suffered during the last year is the amount of time I’ve had to work on my own projects. The travel is fun, and I’ve stayed in some amazing places and worked with some amazing schools, but I usually lose at least a day a week…


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For the past few years, I have been lucky enough to be a part of the TeenTech family, running workshops at TeenTech Events all over the country. At each TeenTech event, myself and Liz Rice from Tank Top TV work with 300+ teenagers a day, helping them to develop their ideas for apps, games, the Internet of Things, and future technology.

The annual TeenTech Awards are designed for UK students aged 11–18, and are designed to enable students to take their interests in science and technology further. They encourage students to develop their own ideas, in groups of three, for…


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A few years ago, back in 2012, myself and Ari Abraham built a game called Zombies Ate My City. It was a pretty cool game. It built a zombie invasion around where you were playing the game. You were set missions in and around your town or city, and you would complete those missions by exploring your world. When you got near the location for a mission, the game would switch to an augmented reality view and you would then defend that location from zombies by swiping on the screen, firing at the zombies that were approaching you. …


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I used to be a cinema addict. In fact, it was pretty much a weekly routine for me. When Tom and I got together, it was a ritual to go catch a movie on a Monday afternoon at the Empire in Poole Park. It was enjoyable, and a pretty affordable afternoon out. Monday afternoons were pretty quiet, cheap, and — as an out of town cinema — the audience was always respectful of the movie, and the rest of the audience, as they’d made an effort to get there specifically to watch a movie they wanted to see.

When Tom…


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Could your pupils be future programmers and innovators? Teaching children coding is becoming more commonplace in UK primary schools and, when taught correctly, it can be extremely engaging, teaching computer science, maths, social skills, teamwork, and problem solving in a relatable way.

The thought of teaching your pupils computer programming probably sounds rather daunting. But we are doing it right now, all around the country, with our Chaos Created Code Workshops. …


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Teaching primary school pupils how to make their first game.

The thought of teaching your pupils computer programming probably sounds rather daunting. But it’s happening, successfully, around the country, and Chaos Created Code Workshops are a great way to introduce computer coding to primary school pupils, and secondary school pupils.

We’ve been running coding workshops all over the UK and Ireland over the past year and a half. Recently, we’ve been working closely with schools and organisations with a focus on pupils with special educational needs and pupils with behavioural or mental health difficulties.

Engaging SEN pupils and children with…

Ali Maggs

I code apps/games through my company (Follow @ChaosCreatedApp). I also run coding workshops in UK schools (Follow @Code_Created) and present at TeenTech events.

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