Jamila Jameel Knows She May Never Be Able to Wear A Designer Dress Again, But Her New Speech Is Worth The Risk

You would think that if you were given the privilege to be the first woman EVER (yes, ever) to host one of the biggest shows on one of the biggest radio stations in your country since it first saw the light of day, the media would have a field day. Add to that the fact that you get almost 200,000 listeners the day you lent your voice to the microphone. Sounds like the recipe for a great article, right?

Well Britain’s Radio 1 host Jameela Jamil did just that. Except the article that came out about her wasn’t singing praises about how she was the first woman EVER to host The Official Chart Show since its inception, or the fact that she had had almost 200,000 people listening to her on the day.

The article they put out talked about her dress size. Yes, that’s right. The article that was released the same day focused on how she had gained 2 dress sizes.

In a very powerful and poignant speech, Jameela shared her frustration that her entire worth “as a broadcaster, but more importantly, as a woman, was being measured by a weighing scale.” She went on to share the very legitimate reasons behind the weight gain that she experienced.

I mean, I don’t know about you, but if I was given the choice that she was (being a size 10 or oxygen), I would have gone with oxygen.

I don’t know about you, but I think we can all agree when I say that I want children out there, both boys and girls, to grow up knowing that having a healthy mind is a hell of a lot better than having a thigh gap or your dream set of washboard abs. I would rather they learn how to love themselves rather than using those Photoshopped images of Victoria’s Secret models to learn to hate their bodies.

Many of us (myself included) grew up seeing nothing but toothpick-skinny girls in the media. It takes Jamil only minutes to point out that despite the fact that we are preaching the idea of curves, we aren’t exactly walking the walk. We are perpetuating that cycle via the fashion industry and social media. The body type we are glorifying in the fashion industry, as Jamil points out, “genuinely emulates people who are suffering from famine on the other side of the world.”

We need to consider the example we are setting for young people out there. I don’t know about you, but I think we can all agree when I say that I want children out there, both boys and girls, to grow up knowing that having a healthy mind is a hell of a lot better than having a thigh gap or your dream set of washboard abs. I would rather they learn how to love themselves rather than using those Photoshopped images of Victoria’s Secret models to learn to hate their bodies.

With mainstream celebrities and people of notoriety like Jamila Jameel coming forward and shining a light on these issues, we can only hope that their courage and vulnerability in sharing their stories will encourage others to do the same. Only when people are vulnerable do we realize that we are not alone. With vulnerability comes strength. And with that strength comes the ability to make the changes that we need to see in order to live a life we all dream of.

Image Credit: Google

Originally posted on Hello Perfect on November 17, 2014

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