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This is a difficult lesson every founder and CEO will have to learn in their career.

In my 40-year career, I’ve observed not only myself but numerous peers blame others for problems within the business-but take all the credit for its successes.

It’s a difficult lesson every founder and CEO will have to learn in their career. Whether it’s a functional area of the company, or the success of the entire business, the buck stops with the leader. Fault is the responsibility of the leader. Poor management, poor bookkeeping, poor performance, all of it is a reflection of the leader. Some founders learn this early on. …


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I have been building companies my entire life.

At my first company, Wilmar/Interline, we had 450 inside and outside salespeople by the time I stepped down as CEO-all across multiple brands and saleschannels. And just like most CEOs and company leaders, I was constantly scratching my head as to why the top 15–20% of our salespeople were consistently outperforming the remaining 75–80%. …


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It’s hard for me to say if I would be the entrepreneur I am today, had I not tried my hand at selling cookies door to door when I was 4 years old, or held the responsibility of running the neighborhood paper route.

In fact, my first real entrepreneurial invention was a pencil holder made out of orange juice concentrate cans. I glued plywood to the cans that my uncle cut up for me, pasted Popsicle sticks on them, painted them, and went selling them door to door. …


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Every company thinks they’re prepared until something comes along that makes them consider how prepared they truly are.

I have been an entrepreneur my entire life, and I’ve never seen anything like the potential impact of the coronavirus global pandemic. I vividly remember fearing for my life during the attacks of September 11th. I remember the mass financial uncertainty that came with the housing crash of 2008. But the global impact of the coronavirus, as quickly as it has spread, is unlike any other event I’ve witnessed in my life.

And I know I’m not alone.

As an entrepreneur, these…


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Not everyone is cut out to be an entrepreneur.

The reason is because entrepreneurship inherently requires a certain level of self-awareness. A lot more goes into building a business than just “doing it.” You actually have to be extremely thoughtful about what you’re building, how you’re going to build it, and most importantly, what type of leader you need to be in order to see your vision through.

I see so many startup entrepreneurs struggle with simply being honest with themselves: honest about the viability of their product or service, honest about the way things are going, honest about how…


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Over the course of my career, I’ve started six businesses from scratch-and three simultaneously.

Today, I am the founder of a private real estate lender called LendingOne, running the company as its CEO. In addition, through my private equity firm called Crestar Partners, I’ve invested in three companies in the past 100 days-and am on the board of two of them. I also have two more in the pipeline to potentially close in the next 60–90 days.

Needless to say, my schedule is packed. And none of this includes the fact that my son, Adam, is launching a new business…


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Everyone knows the incredible feeling of waking up early and getting a jump start on the day.

It might be difficult to get yourself out of bed, but as soon as you’re up, and you start to get going, you realize just how much you can get done before everyone else is awake. There’s something motivating about knowing that by the time the rest of the world is racing to work, you’ve already gone to the gym, or read the morning paper, or cranked through your inbox and are at the office with a cup of coffee.

Especially if you’re…


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The moment you decide you want to become an entrepreneur, is the moment you sign yourself up for a life of troubleshooting.

When it comes to going your own way in life-whether that means building a small business, or swinging for the fences and aiming to build a global company-you must be prepared for all the hardships that come with that freedom. The idea of becoming an entrepreneur (or worse, someone’s “boss”) might sound like a ton of fun, but the truth is, it’s a journey of never-ending obstacles.

The best entrepreneurs either know this “brutal truth” going into it…


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I have been building businesses my entire life.

From the time I was a little kid, I was always looking for ways to make a little extra money. I ended up starting my first business in high school, selling plumbing supplies at the local flea market.

Fast-forward twenty years, and my flea market business had turned into a publicly traded company doing more than $600 million in revenue and employing more than 2,300 people with 60 distribution centers across the US, Canada, and Puerto Rico. …


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If you ever have an opportunity to spend some quality time with a really successful entrepreneur or CEO, take it. Pay attention. Ask questions, and then listen to the way they respond.

When I was first starting out as an entrepreneur, I made it a point to spend as much time as possible with people who had already done the very thing I was setting out to do. I’d pick their brains and take notes. And one thing I learned after meeting a lot of entrepreneurs is that the most successful ones are passionate about their business and can do…

Bill Green

CEO | Entrepreneur | Author of ALL IN: 101 Real Life Business Lessons | Sharing insights from my decades in business | Get my book: https://rebrand.ly/All-In

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