Coding 101 (for the most basic beginners)

Being an interior design student, coding + I never got along. Back in grade 10, I was forced to take a computer science class, as it was the only class available for my schedule. It ended up with my teacher being extremely generous toward my marks.

I chose to complete an exercise on code.org. Upon first glance, I assumed the exercise would be fairly simple since all the interfaces appeared to be marketed towards younger kids. Users are able to select what subject the coding exercises revolve around — art, science, math, social studies, languages, and computer science. Each exercise is estimated to be about an hour

I completed the “Moana: Wayfinding with Code” exercise. It is marketed for users in grade 2+, in 23 different languages and for those who are beginner. The exercise is a visual programming exercise that users various blocks that you drag and drop in order to write lines of code. The exercise consisted of 19 progressive modules. At first it seemed fairly easy and like a game, as I got halfway through, it brought back memories of my computer science. The blocks are connected and act as lines of code; users are able to write sequences and run the code. The characters of Moana “run” through the sequence that the users produce and if it’s wrong, you’re able to visually see where the mistake lies. I got to the 17th module and that’s when I got into trouble. Each module is set up so it gives the user the main sequence, and then you have to drag and drop each block accordingly to complete the sequence. I spent half an hour playing around with every possible sequence (or I thought). The downside to the exercise was that there wasn’t a button to click for help or additional hints.

Screenshot of progress from www.code.org

About an hour and a half later, I completed all 19 modules and finished the exercise. I chose the exercise on the fact that it was Moana themed tbh. But as someone who is 22 and depends on technology on a daily basis, I was surprised when I got to the point where I felt stupid because I couldn’t figure out how to complete the sequence properly to move on. My basic knowledge from grade 10 computer science did help me understand the way code should be written, which helped me understand the process of the exercise better. Overall, I think it was an interesting and interactive experience which helped me learn that coding can be fun but it is not meant for me.

#eid100 #module9 #coding #stillanamateur

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