Excited about Bad Moms the Movie? Sure it will be fun to watch some fictional moms onscreen throw caution, and acceptable standards of behavior, to the wind. But why limit your living vicariously to two hours in a movie theatre? Curl up in a chaise lounge pool or beachside and continue the adventure. Here are five books to grab for your August vacation that will entertain you with tales of motherhood gone off the rails.

Pushing the Limits: A Spoonful of Sugar
This lead character in this Bad Mom book has the best of intentions, but she could have done a little more reference checking before her spur-of-the-moment decision to hire a nanny off Craigslist. She learns that the old saying if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is, is particularly true when it comes to childcare. You’ll close this gem feeling relieved that whatever lapses you’ve ever had as a mom never landed you on the evening news, or worse.

Sure to be a Classic: Where’d You Go Bernadette?
Who among us hasn’t thought about running away from it all — the nosy neighbor, the irritating work colleague, the demanding school volunteers? Bernadette runs all the way to Antarctica and her delightful daughter brings us along for the ride.

And Oldie But a Goodie: Anywhere But Here
Motherhood on a shoestring and a dream: this tale of a restless mother, and her responsible daughter, is the Thelma and Louise of motherhood books. Mona Simpson’s original can and should be picked up again and again.

The Bad Mom’s Guide: Shitty Mom
This is a hilarious guide for getting through parenting challenges with a sense of humor. Chapters like “How to Sleep Until 9 A.M. every weekend” will at least have you laughing your way through 6 a.m. wake ups.

Grab a Glass of Wine Before Starting this One: Haywire
Ok, maybe not a light read, but this book that’s been called the tale of “the worst family that anybody has ever had,” is the story of Hollywood’s Brooke Hayward. It’s riveting and tragic, and it will stay with you long after you put it down.

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