KSU Quidditch Team

https://vimeo.com/194576217

Quidditch is a game created by author J.K Rowling for the Harry Potter universe. In the books and movies, the players fly around on magical broomsticks and try to score more points than the other team. In the real world, people cannot fly so players keep their feet planted firmly on the ground when playing the game.

Freshman theater studies major John Smith decided to go to Kent State University because it had a quidditch team.

“It was definitely one of the top three factors,” Smith said. “Because three of the other colleges I looked at didn’t have any, at all.”

Smith chose Kent over Wright State University, Wittenberg University and Florida State University. Of those, only Florida State University had a quidditch team but it was too far away from home.

Smith said his favorite thing about the quidditch team is the fact that the captains ensure that everyone receives equal playing time regardless of skill level.

“Everyone no matter how small they are or how bad they are gets a fair shot at playing,” Smith said. “And that’s what I love about it because if they hadn’t I probably, being as scrawny as I am, couldn’t have been able to play as much as I do now.”

Quidditch teams are made up of 7 different positions: one keeper, two beaters, three chasers and one seeker.

The keeper acts as a goalie would in a game of soccer and defends the hoops from the other team’s chasers.

Chasers are the ones responsible for scoring the majority of the points. They run around the pitch with a quaffle, volleyball, and try to throw it through the hoops of the other team. Each time they score it is worth ten points.

Beaters are responsible for slowing down another team and forcing them to “remount”. The beaters carry bludgers, dodgeballs, and if they hit anyone with it they have to run back to their own hoops and “remount” on their broom.

The seeker is the one who ends the game. They are responsible for catching the snitch, tennis ball in a sock sticking out of a neutral party’s shorts. When the seeker catches the snitch, the game is over and they score 30 points.

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