Abracadabra Android App

Costume coordinating for the conscious couple.

Problem:
 
Couples often find it difficult to figure out what to match as for Halloween. Often, someone likes to dress up more and the other could not care less about matching or dressing up. How might we create a costume matching system to help a person select costumes to immediately match with their significant other?

Audience:
 
My audience would be couples who liked to dress up in costumes for Halloween between 18–40.

Constraints:
Time: 2 days. This was a Lean UX project and we had to have deliverables ready by Tuesday afternoon.

Unfamiliarity: Neither of us owned an Android device. We spent time researching and reading about the Android interface.

Process:
 
We began the brainstorming process by creating an empathy map and persona. We developed a persona, George Blaize, who had a 5-year domestic partner who he enjoyed matching with for their friend’s Big Halloween Bash each year.

Our empathy map highlighted issues of disagreement as a major pain point for our users.
This is George. He likes dressing up for Halloween with his partner.

Then, we both individually created screens and iterations of what we thought our app would look like. We combined the paper prototypes into a final paper prototype.

Here are my first sketches for app ideation.
Combined Paper Prototype

After we tested our prototype with Android users, we found a lack of flow because we didn’t understand the Android interface. We created back and home buttons in our app, as well as limited our pop-out drawer.

Our final paper prototype. We tested this with our Android Developer.

For this project, we had the opportunity to test with an Android developer. He provided us great insight for us to add iterations that involved additional “share” and “favorite” buttons for better clarity. We included these changes in our wireframes.

Our wireframes were costume-focused.
Final Hi-Fi Prototypes (selected Screens)

*We had further screens, but scrapped many of them for the sake of time, flow, and simplicity.

Process: User Research, User Testing, Empathy Map, Personas, Prototyping, Wireframing, Sketches, Paper Prototyping, Lean UX.

Takeaways:
 
Flow First: We had a few user flows we planned out initially, which had us working on many screens. After focusing our flows, we simplified our flow to a more user-friendly experience.