This story is unavailable.

Funny, I watched the series for this reason alone. (the fact that is was going to face tremendous resistance and attract racist vitriol) simply for addressing the BLM movement. I didn’t expect to be entertained, because I expected it to be way too millennial for me - which is to say I expected it to have a lot bizarre, strange, cynical stuff that millennials tend to gravitate toward, and a meandering ADD sort of fragmented storyline.

But actually, I was entertained. I found a series of interlocking stories, creating a larger one. Quite cool. While every character only got 30 minutes (I mean how much character development can you do in 30 minutes) the last thing I would say about these characters is that they were one dimensional. They seemed incredibly complex to me, (especially given the time and medium constraints) all having a variety of motivations for wanting to take various actions that they ultimately took. Beyond making a political statement about BLM, which I felt that it did, and very well — with the student body going through so many different machinations to try to decide how to deal with the campus security’s use of excessive use of force — I felt the series captured the complexities and multi-facets of the African-American experience, extraordinarily well. It was actually refreshing to see black experiences depicted beyond the one and two dimensional stereotypes, that get played out and rehashed on an infinite endless loop in all the mainstream genres, you know with the token black friend who says funny hip ethnic things, but always ends up like John, dying, in the end? A hole cast of really complex black characters…it was lovely.

Perhaps it is too dated and that’s why I could relate. I found everyone always checking their phones constantly and at the same time, odd. Is it really like that? It doesn’t have the nihilistic, f*ck it all to hell, random meandering feel of say Atlanta, which the young black Millenials seem to adore…but when did cogent story-telling become an anathema to cool?

Like what you read? Give Amber Lisa a round of applause.

From a quick cheer to a standing ovation, clap to show how much you enjoyed this story.