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Now this is a disorganized rant. At any rate, I do know my family’s history with slavery in America. I also know my cultural history as an African-American. I have studied slavery and it’s impact on African-Americans extensively, Svetlana Voreskova has not; and even she admit that she doesn’t have very much insight into American slavery, although she does know a lot about the history of slavery in other parts of the world, which is not entirely relevant.

We are talking about America. America is a country that was supposed to be different, than Rome, or China or Wales or whatever other kind of slavery there has been in other countries.

America held itself out as different, from the start. Many American promises were made, around the abolishment of slavery, around retribution and reparations, and all manner of various laws.

Many American promises were broken. There is an extensive and rich history in America, regarding African- American slavery. The new Smithsonian museum on African-American history has four floors worth of documentation of relentless terror that has been visited on African-Americans- since day one. The museum touches on a great deal of information that I wasn’t even aware of, like how many slave revolted against the inhuman conditions they lived under. How many whites were killed in these revolts and how this information was purposefully suppressed throughout history, to discourage such revolts.

I was surprised by how many times African-Americans established independent vibrant townships that were ultimately destroyed by terrorist white groups, which wanted to ensure that blacks remained in poverty and that the American racial caste system, with blacks at the bottom, remained in place.

Yes this is history that you’d probably like to deny the existence of. But that would be pointless. There is a brand new- multi-million dollar museum in the nation’s capital that documents this history extensively, and yet only touches the tip of the iceberg.

Relying upon oral tradition, books, video, and the sort of recreated environments that museum’s are known for, I can have a pretty good idea of what my African-American history is. Everyone should know their own personal history, and every American should know the truth about race relations in America, but many, of all the races would rather not confront any of these inconvenient truths. Everyone is comfortable with certain lies, because to confront the ugly truth about American racism is plain uncomfortable for all parties involved.

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