Which in its way, makes a Miles Davis or a Charles Mingus or an Oscar Peterson even more a symbol of black men’s achievements, than they were ever trying to be
My oh my, what a wonderful journey of discovery awaits you on the very meaning of jazz.
Ron Collins
11

Well I like them the best Miles Davis and a Charles Mingus. They really sound extraordinary. People rave about Thelonious Monk, but eh…I think I prefer Billy Joel or Elton John…as far as piano men go.

But Miles Davis…people say he was a genius…I can dig it…his jazz it sounds more cutting edge, ground breaking, even now! (Because his hey say was 70s right?) but here it is 2017 and I’m like hey, Miles…I really like the sound of this!

I like Charles Mingus too, it almost sounds a little classical, like he’s channeling Mozart…who knows, maybe he was. You can never go wrong with Mozart or Beethoven…not ever. The fifth is always being played, at any given time, all over the world, so said my father…but I don’t know if that’s true…how could anyone measure such a thing?

But Duke Ellington. I loved the whole thing! I really like his sound. I actually think I like him better without the words…I’ve heard “Minnie the Moocher.” It’s silly! He should stick to the A train.

But you’re right, there are jazz singers, also there are blues singers, most I’d consider too old school for my taste. But with jazz, much like classical, the words are usually incidental…it’s the music that you remember, more than anything.