“Hey, don’t even worry about it.”

I was recently working on a project focused on building out a feature that would address the needs of users with limited or no short term memory (STM). I quickly realized that this is not a frequently discussed aspect of UX design or research. In an effort to bring more awareness to the possible challenges of designing for limited STM users, the following is a brief summary of my research insights and my thoughts on working with individuals with limited STM.

See the full case study here.

Context


Drawn vector image of woman walking and looking at shapes in background
Drawn vector image of woman walking and looking at shapes in background
Images from undraw.co

“Designing with accessibility in mind” is becoming a catch phrase in UX design. As the industry continues to grow, designers are becoming more specialized and fields are expanding. Not all designers can specialize in accessible design, but Figma plugins like Stark, browser extensions like Visual Aira, and Microsoft’s Inclusion ToolKit make it easier to design for accessibility regardless of a designer’s skillset.

As a new designer, I find these tools immensely useful. The ability to make designs more accessible is always a benefit, but I have noticed a trend in the way accessible design is discussed in UX communities that…

Pippa Nardie-Warner (she/her)

UX/UI designer and cognitive accessibility advocate. 🖥 amypippa.com. Currently working at cityofwinddesign.com.

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