A response to the recent articles featuring my sexual assault

Hi, my name is “the alleged third victim”, the one from the articles recently published by KTVU and The Campanile. The one who declined interviews with the press because almost two years later, I still can’t handle another constant reminder of what happened. I know a lot of you are shocked, but what worries me even more is that so many of you aren’t… Simply because sexual assault is so common that, as my friend put it, “most kids weren’t too surprised.”

But let’s not make something this outrageous become “normal” just because it’s common. Let’s not just post judgmental Facebook comments like “I bet he was white” and “typical privileged ass rapist” and “sooo typical”. LETS NOT LET THIS BECOME ANY MORE TYPICAL THAN IT ALREADY IS.

It took me a while to realize what happened that night. It took even longer to be able to say that I was raped rather than simply “taken advantage of”. It’s taken until now to even begin to comprehend the event — and I still have a ways to go. But the time I’ve taken to process my sexual assault does not undermine the fact that it happened. Everyone needs time to come to terms with their negative experiences.

So let’s open our arms to those who need to share, whenever they are ready. Let’s tell them that WE BELIEVE THEM. Let’s ensure that kids feel safe in our high schools by educating ourselves and others about protection from sexual violence.

Please, don’t let this become a failed example that shows other students they can get away with acts like these. My life changed in one night, but rape culture won’t change overnight… we must be vigilant in educating all young people about the realities of sexual violence. We will not tolerate this.

Thank you.

PS. To my peers who have been sexually assaulted at any point in their lives: I believe you. I’m here for you and so is everyone else, more than you know. You are not alone.

National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1–800–656–4673
www.rainn.org

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