Reaction from the Architect

Quebec Laurentians 2015

The connection between communication and graffiti effects us directly and is an immediate reaction from the creator.

Quebec Laurentians 2015

Documentaries such as Banksy Does New York is a perfect example of how artists are using the street to communicate. The documentary is a clear reflection of how this type of art is making a commentary on the world today. Guiding eyes and thoughts towards the issues of today.

Montreal 2015

Graffiti is a form of silent communication. These images and words become a time capsule to our history often disappearing and ever emerging.

Montreal 2015

Another documentary “Which Way is the Front Line From Here” is about the life of photographer and filmmaker Tim Hetherington. Little did I know that this particular film would shed light on war graffiti. Hetherington saying that the images were “often more horrific that the war itself.” The images were created in war, in conflict zones. A harsh reflection often into the only world the illustrator knows. Hetherington a seasoned photojournalist whom died in Libya was deeply affected by what he saw.

Montreal 2015

As I watched the documentary it confirmed my thoughts on Graffiti and the environment. How we have the need to release what we feel inside. Street art gives us that release, that immediate freedom of expression. It was such an integral part of how he was effected by what he saw.

“The childlike scrawls of rape, violence and intimidation are pretty grim, but it all gets out of hand when you see the cupboard with “room of pain” etched on it.”
Montreal, Place des Arts 2015

After the bombings in Paris the street art community called on artists to help the city heal. The phrase used was “Spray for Paris,” asking graffiti artists to “Pray for Paris,” Again graffiti whether words or images at any level level coming together to help.

“Street art in Paris has long been directly tied to public issues and politics.”
Montreal, 2015

The same holds true in what we see on the streets in Montreal today.

Old Montreal 2015

Our streets a direct and immediate reaction/reflection of what society is dealing with. People choosing to communicate through the streets as it is an immediate gut reaction to what they feeling.

Montreal, St Laurent 2015

Sometimes crude and at times sophisticated always communicative.

Monttreal, St Henri

As I shot these photos and contemplated my project I decided to do the series in black & white. Choosing black & white for its sense of direct communication, bringing it down to the elemental aspect of each piece.

Montreal, China Town, 2015

Both the imagery and words convey emotions in street art. Graffiti forces us to take notice of issues that are effecting us.

Montreal, 2015

That visceral gut reaction that is felt at the moment.

Montreal, 2015

We are all dealing with the same hurts, loves, issues around the globe and all we really want is to be loved, acknowledged and find peace.

Montreal, 2015

Graffiti is a direct reflection of the global loves and stresses.

Montreal, 2015
“Art is an evolutionary act. The shape of art and its role in society is constantly changing. At no point is art static. There are no rules.” 
Raymond Salvatore Harmon
Montreal, 2015
Montreal, 2015
“Speak softly, but carry a big can of paint.” 
Banksy, Wall and Piece
Montreal, 2015
“Blank walls are a shared canvas and we’re all artists.” 
Carla H. Krueger
Montreal, 2015
Montreal, 2015
This morning you are magnificent, Montreal, 2015
“Imagine a city where graffiti wasn’t illegal, a city where everybody could draw whatever they liked. Where every street was awash with a million colours and little phrases. Where standing at a bus stop was never boring. A city that felt like a party where everyone was invited, not just the estate agents and barons of big business. Imagine a city like that and stop leaning against the wall — it’s wet.” 
Banksy, Wall and Piece
Montreal, 2015