Hacking search intent ranks you 4 positions higher in Google

  1. The highest ranking content addresses the intent, not just the keywords. It’s highly unlikely that someone trying to find out about “equity release” expects or wants to find an “equity release calculator” on the same page. That is not to say that customers may be interested in navigation to the calculator from the Equity Release page, as they qualify themselves. There’s not enough overlap so no point hedging your bets on that front.
  2. Your users have lots more work to do. Let’s assume a parallel universe where someone is interested in both finding out what equity release is and calculating how much equity release they would get, and let’s assume you somehow create content that ranks for both intents. Is that content going to please the end-user? No, because there will be too much content to work, especially on a mobile screen through after reading about how equity release schemes work and the different ones available. Assuming every single user matters, and you need to be laser targeted on satisfying that user with a compelling offer and making it seamless for them to convert. The content will either be too thin on the info they need, or to heavy on the info they don’t need.
  3. Too many of your site pages will rank for the same keyword. It might sound good to flood Search Engine Result Pages (SERPs) with your site, but it isn’t when it’s on page 2. Google doesn’t like cannibalisation as it is forced to choose between content. If it’s showing loads of your URLs for the same keyword, it’s a sign that the all the relevant content is either split or duplicated across all of those pages. The impact of cannibalisation constrains the maximum ranking position achievable, which results in a dilution of PageRank (i.e. users and the press can now link to more than 1 landing page).
  4. All this can lead to lower user satisfaction and higher bounce rates. Your page authority won’t look good after all that….

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