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(cover image was originally copied from here)

This post was written by Andrew Evans and Ram Ramkumar as a follow on to their RVA.JS meetup virtual presentation that can be seen here.

Building software today is a challenging pursuit. Teams often work with tight deadlines and shifting requirements. Even after the project’s completion, you may find yourself following the long tail of the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC), which usually involves production support and complex updates.

One of the reasons this happens is because applications have traditionally been built in the same way as a house. It starts with a foundation, then the walls, utilities, and finishing touches. …


If you’re just starting or a seasoned JavaScript developer, chances are you’ve heard of RxJS. Let’s dive in

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Photo by Zany Jadraque on Unsplash.

If you’re just starting or a seasoned JavaScript developer, chances are you’ve heard of RxJS.

RxJS is currently one of the most popular JavaScript libraries. This piece is going to cover a basic walkthrough of what it is and how you can use it in your applications.

History

So before I begin, it helps to get an understanding of the history behind RxJS.

It all started with Reactive Extensions (or ReactiveX). ReactiveX was a concept that was originally invented by Erik Meijer. It was an implementation of the Observer Pattern. After it was developed, subsequent programming libraries were developed around the major languages like .NET …


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Rey after her latest restaurant adventure to our local Starbucks.

I’ve written several posts in the past using Firebase and the AngularFire2 library. The AngularFire2 library makes using and integrating Firebase with your Angular applications super fun and easy.

AngularFire2 also enables you to build JAMStack applications which only require a frontend and calls to the various Firebase services (Auth, Database, etc.). After following the docs on the AngularFire2 README, you can get up and running fairly easily. From there its just a matter of injecting the different services into your Angular Components.

I recently built an Angular application that uses AngularFire2. The application also uses Jest for unit testing. …


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Over the past few weeks I’ve been learning about ElectronJS (also known just as “Electron”), and wanted to write about my experiences and applications I built. In the process of learning, I built both an Angular and an Electron version of the classic game “Connect 4.”

The projects can be found at the following links:

I wrote both an Angular and an Electron version so that I could compare the two frameworks, and learn a little more about the underlying tooling in the process.

This post is going to cover some background about Electron, and walkthrough building a “Connect 4” game with it. …


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I had some time off with the holidays, and also recently purchased Canna Kit’s Raspberry Pi Zero W starter kit. Putting the two together, I thought it’d be fun to do something Christmasy with my Raspberry Pi!

This post is going to cover how I was able to create a fireplace display with my Raspberry Pi. Note I’m using a Raspberry Pi Zero W.

Background

The motivation for this project came from seeing fun fireplace displays in the past. There are apps that you can install on your phone or TV, and there are also lots of YouTube videos available.

I thought it’d be fun to do something similar, but with a Raspberry Pi. It’d be a chance to learn a little more about the Raspberry Pi, and have fun too. …


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Recently I needed to get a daily weather forecast, but wanted to get it over text message rather than an app or email.

After looking at a few technologies, I realized I could build my own daily alert with a little JavaScript.

This post is going to cover how I setup a daily weather forecast that was delivered via AWS Lambda and Twilio. My project was written in JavaScript and uses the AWS node SDK.

An open source version of my project is available on GitHub here.

The Overall Flow

Before we get too heavy in the details, I wanted to highlight the overall flow. …


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In this post I will be building out an API with Google’s Firebase. I will be building out the back-end with Firebase Cloud Functions and ExpressJS.

Before I begin, I recommend you have the following setup:

  1. A terminal setup on either a Windows, Linux, or Mac (OSX) computer
  2. Node 10.10 installed
  3. NVM installed with the instructions here
  4. A Google Account
  5. Postman installed
  6. Firebase CLI installed with a run of the terminal command npm install -g firebase-tools

I’m going to be referring to the code available at this GitHub repo. The GitHub repo also contains a Postman Collection — I recommend importing that collection and using that to test your project. Please note that the app id in the URL paths is specific to my deployed project. You'll need to change the app id to match a project you'll be creating in the Firebase Console. …

About

Andrew Evans

Husband, Engineer, OSS Contributor, and Manager at CapTech Consulting. Follow me on https://rhythmandbinary.com and https://andrewevans.dev

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