Above: banner image of Self Evident, an upcoming Asian American podcast.

An excerpt of this story was originally published in the March 22, 2019 issue of The Slant, an Asian American newsletter. Want more stories like this one? Subscribe for free.

Read the unedited interview transcript with Self Evident’s managing producer, James Boo.

They say it’s a golden age of podcasting, and it’s hard to argue. Serial and S-Town drew even the wariest listeners into rapt attention. Homecoming, 2 Dope Queens and My Brother, My Brother and Me made it on TV. Marc Maron hosted Barack Obama in his garage.

On the corporate side of things, Spotify devoured Gimlet Media and…


Logo image of Self Evident, an upcoming new Asian American podcast.

An excerpt of this interview was originally published in the March 22, 2019 issue of The Slant, a weekly Asian American newsletter. Want more stories like this one? Subscribe today.

This is the full transcript of The Slant’s interview with James Boo, managing producer at Asian American podcast Self Evident. Read our story here.

Let’s start with the basics. Pretend I know nothing about Self Evident or even the current slate of Asian American podcasts. What is the podcast about?

Self Evident is a podcast that takes on what it means to be American by telling Asian American stories. So…


Photo via Tiffany Chu

As a kid, actress Tiffany Chu devoured Chinese songs and TV shows by the dozen. From Meteor Garden to My Fair Princess, Wang Leehom to Jay Chou, Chu got a crash course on the essentials of mid-2000s Chinese and Taiwanese pop culture.

“I was one of those kids who secretly liked Chinese school,” Chu tells me. “Even if I didn’t like the homework so much.”

Between stars like Fan Bingbing and Jolin Tsai, Chu got an education in acting, too, emulating actresses she’d seen cry on cue. “I’d be in the shower, and [start crying] and be like, ‘see? I…


LA-via-Seattle band Tangerine, fresh off the release of their EP, White Dove. Photo credit: Mark Malijan.

This story was originally published in the November 2nd, 2018 issue of The Slant. Want more Asian American stories like this one? Subscribe to the newsletter for free.

Marika Justad, her sister Miro, and Tobias Kuhn have made music since childhood. And as the band Tangerine, they’ve still got youth on their mind.

Though now, it’s from retrospect, and specifically from “the messiness of finding yourself in your 20s.”

“Your 20s is such an interesting time,” Marika Justad tells me over the phone. “You’re still young enough to be dreaming and trying to build your career, trying to figure out…


Cover art of White Dove, by Tangerine

This story was originally published in the November 2nd, 2018 issue of The Slant. Want more Asian American stories like this one? Subscribe to the newsletter for free.

This is the full transcript of our feature on Tangerine’s Marika Justad.

I read your press release for White Dove and the thing that grabbed me was the last sentence, that your music is full of “the messiness of finding yourself in your 20s.” Could you speak to that as a driving force?

We actually wrote that line! (laughs) That was something we wanted to put out there. I think it’s, you…


Photo: Lulu Cheng

This story was originally published in the October 19th, 2018 issue of The Slant. Want more Asian American stories like this one? Subscribe to the newsletter for free.

This is the full transcript of our feature on Lulu Cheng.

Your email newsletter stands out among all the other emails I get, because it’s personal. It’s interesting that email has kind of resurged because you get that direct view into the author, and you get to have those conversations. What got you to pursue /tell it slant/?

So when I started the newsletter, maybe a few years ago now maybe, it…


Photo credit: Lulu Cheng

This story was originally published in the October 19th, 2018 issue of The Slant. Want more Asian American stories like this one? Subscribe to the newsletter for free.

Lulu Cheng is taking a touchy-feely class. The touchy-feely class, in fact, with an Inc article, business school pieces and plenty of anecdotes from touchy-feely graduates who learn leadership skills, forge relationships, and pretty much get group therapy.

“The kind of adjective that people use to talk about it is transformative, which is a really interesting word,” Cheng tells me over the phone. “You get a lot of feedback on first impressions…


Filmmakers Vivian Huang and Adina Luo. Photo courtesy Adina Luo.

This is the full interview transcript of our feature on Adina Luo and Vivian Huang, published originally on September 27, 2018 in The Slant, an Asian American newsletter.

For more interviews with Asian American artists, community leaders and more, subscribe for free.

So tell me a little about yourselves and how this project got started.

Adina Luo: Vivian and I met back when we were in school, and we’ve been writing together since then. After we graduated, both of us went into jobs in tech. I was working in venture for a while, but storytelling — film, television, telling these…


Vivian Huang and Adina Luo. Photo courtesy Adina Luo.

This story was originally published in the September 28, 2018 issue of The Slant, a weekly newsletter featuring Asian American news, media and culture. For more stories like this one, subscribe for free.

Filmmakers Adina Luo and Vivian Huang took a circuitous route to Hollywood. After stints in venture and software engineering, respectively, Luo and Huang chose to pursue their passions for storytelling, and especially telling Asian American stories. Their latest series, The Kids Table, launched September 25 on YouTube.

“We wanted to tell a deeply Asian American story that wasn’t explaining our identity to someone else, but rather exploring…


Photo credit: Tory Stolper Photography

This story was originally published in the September 14, 2018 issue of The Slant, an e-mail newsletter featuring Asian American news, media and culture. Want more stories like this one? Subscribe for free.

Here are a few things Katherine Ho didn’t think would happen to her: acting in Special Agent Oso as a kid with big dreams, placing in the top 32 on The Voice during high school, continuing her music career in college (beyond a minor in songwriting), and sitting in a movie theater as her Mandarin cover of Coldplay’s “Yellow” played over the ending of Crazy Rich Asians.

Andrew Hsieh

Editor-in-chief at The Slant (https://slant.email), a weekly Asian American newsletter. I write a lot, read a lot, and play a lot of videogames.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store