Transcendence Through Thomas Jefferson

To cheerfully reinforce my strong opinion that wine can be the ultimate vessel of mental and experiential transcendence, I have chosen a few of my favorite thoughts from one of my idols, Thomas Jefferson, who spent a lifetime as an expert in multiple disciplines — and wine lived and breathed with him through all of his ventures:

“in nothing have the habits of the palate more decisive influence than in our relish of wines…

Good wine is a necessity of life for me…

particularly attached my taste to it. I now drink nothing else, and am apprehensive that if I should fail in the means of getting it, it will be a privation which I shall feel sensibly once a day…

There is a 3d kind of wine which I am less able to specify to you with certainty by it’s particular name. I used to meet with it at Paris under the general term of Vin rouge de Roussillon… I suppose there may be many kinds of wine of Roussillon; but I never saw any but of that particular quality used at Paris…

because in the art, by mixing genuine wines, (one can produce) any flavor desired…

the true restorative cordial…

By making this wine vine known to the public, I have rendered my country as great a service as if I had enabled it to pay back the national debt…

I have lived temperately…I double the doctor’s recommendation of a glass and a half of wine each day and even treble it with a friend…

if drunk in moderation, softens the temper, cheers the spirit and promotes health”

And, as a bonus, I add one from a Ernest Hemingway, most likely invoked by Thomas Jefferson’s legacy:

“In Europe we thought of wine as something as healthy and normal as food and also a great giver of happiness and well being and delight. Drinking wine was not a snobbism nor a sign of sophistication nor a cult; it was as natural as eating and to me as necessary”

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