Ou Vanda & Rizal Balatbat on helping older people in Cambodia and the Philippines

Angela Santillo
Oct 25 · 23 min read
Ou Vanda & Rizal Balatbat

This is a transcript from episode 41 of the podcast And Then Suddenly.

This episode is part of And Then Suddenly; Rising Voice(s). This special series features conversations with partners from Voice. Based in Africa and Asia, these individuals -often leaders of organizations or small groups- are working tirelessly to ensure that their own voices as well as those they represent are at the table and not on the menu. The moments they share are their very own and the conversations are impromptu and candid.


Angela Santillo
In 2002, the Second World Assembly on Aging met in Madrid, and former Secretary General of the United Nations, Kofi Annan started his speech with this, “In Africa it is said when an old man dies a library vanishes. This proverb may vary among continents, but its meaning is equally true in any culture. Older persons are intermediaries between the past, the present and the future. Their wisdom and experience form a veritable lifeline in society. We meet today to pay tribute to the contribution of older people and to formulate a strategy to help them lead the safe and dignified lives they deserve.”

Angela Santillo
This is And Then Suddenly, the podcast about the unexpected moments that turn our lives upside down. I’m Angela Santillo. And welcome. This is the show but big life moments. I don’t know what my guests are going to talk about until we meet and this is the second episode and my very first special series “And Suddenly; Rising Voice(s).” If you missed the first episode, well, this is what you should do. Listen to this one and then head back to Episode 38 and hear my conversation with Anan Bouapha, on his journey to becoming an LGBT activist in Laos. Alright, so where are you? What’s happening? What’s a special series? Let me recap. “And Suddenly; Rising Voice(s)” is a special set of episodes featuring conversations with partners from Voice. Now these guests are from Africa and Asia and they’re often the leaders of organizations who are working really hard to make sure that their voice, along with those that they represent, are at the table and not on the menu. And Voice is an integrative grant facility. They promote diversity inclusion in 10 countries in Asia and Africa and they aim to amplify and connect thus far unheard voices and efforts to leave no one behind, based on the principle of nothing about us, without us. And they’re financed by the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs and executed by Oxfam Novib and Hivos. So there you go, I caught you up. We’re all here. This is happening. And this episode is being released on October 1st. So happy October, but also happy International Day of Older Persons. Now this day came about in 1990 and the quote you heard at the top of the episode was from the Second World Assembly on Aging, which met in 2002. And it met in order to respond the opportunities and challenges of the population aging in the 21st century. Now, let me give you some facts about the aging population. At the moment in the world, there are about 700 million people right now who are over the age of 60. But by 2050, 2 billion people, which is over 20% of the world’s population, will be 60 or over. That’s a pretty big number. It’s pretty profound. And, as the UN would say, “With that in mind enhanced attention to the particular needs and challenges faced by many older people is clearly required.” And every International Day of Older Persons has a theme. And this year’s theme is the Journey to Age Equity. And one of their guiding principles is, let me read this for you, “to explore societal and structural changes in view of life course policies, including lifelong learning, proactive adaptive labor policies, social protection, and universal health coverage.”

Angela Santillo
So, I want to feature for the first time ever on the show two guests in one episode. Partly because I’ve never had a special series before, so the sky is the limit on innovation and new episode techniques. But the other is I had the amazing chance to interview two individuals who had very similar and yet very different stories. They’re both older people in retirement. They’re both working to help fellow seniors. So I decided to bundle these conversations in honor of International Day of Older Persons. So I had the pleasure of interviewing Rizal Balatbat from the Philippines, who you’re going to hear from and a little bit. And then I also had the chance to have a Skype telephone call with Ou Vanda and she’s in Cambodia. Now she’s affiliated with Help Age Cambodia. They are the country’s leading agency in aging and they’ve been working in this space for over 20 years. And there’s an acronym you’re going to hear a lot, which is OPA. And I just wanted to give you some background in that. OPA stands for Older Persons Associations, and they are older people led safety net groups that address the social and welfare protection of older people in Cambodia. So that’s the phrase you’re going to hear, that’s what it means, and without further do here is Ou Vanda via Skype telephone call.

Ou Vanda
Yes. My name is Vanda-Ou Vanda. I’m 63 years old. I want to tell you about my life. Yeah. You see?

Angela Santillo
Yes.

Ou Vanda
Okay, yes. After my I finished my study and university, I started working at the provincial hospital. Okay? From 1986 to 2005, I work in the provincial hospital. You hear me, yeah?

Angela Santillo
Yeah. Oh yes. Yeah, I can hear you.

Ou Vanda
I worked in a general room for female patient at that time. At that time, I surely won’t forget as long as I live, an old lady. An old lady, my patient who had got heart failure. She came in my room, my ward and her husband came to take care of her. Their children all die in Pol Pot regime, so they have no children to take care.

Angela Santillo
Okay.

Ou Vanda
Yes, yes. Before Pol Pot, they rich. After Pol Pot regime she become poor. And she had heart failure and she came in my ward and three day after her hospitalization she passed away. Okay? She passed away at that time. Her husband looked very sad, but he didn’t cry. He didn’t cry. We know that he had no money. So, we collect the money from my staff and the patient who stay in the same ward. And when we put the money-and you see? The tear came from his eye and he cry, cry loudly and he said that she has nothing. She had nothing, have no home, has no money, have no children, had no relative. And now his wife, his beloved wife passed away, left him alone. So how does he survive? He cry, cry, cry loudly at the time. And we cry too, we cry too with him. And after that, we have another case. An old woman, she had five children and he had got a stroke with paralyzes on the right side, you see?

Angela Santillo
She did? She was paralyzed.

Ou Vanda
Yes. On the right side. Yes. And at that time, you know, we have not enough medicine-medication for the patient. And I asked the children to buy some medication for her. But no one, no one get my prescription you see? All the children can no take my prescription and that her children asked to take her back home. They said that they were too busy to take off at the hospital. You see at the time, we have not enough nurses to take care of the patient. So at that time we asked the children to take care of the patient instead of our nurses. But no one, no one want to take her.

Ou Vanda
And from 2005 to 2012, I move to care for people living with HIV and AIDS. And from 2012 to the end of 2017, I moved to provincial health department, where I collaborate with Health H Cambodia to improve the health of all the people and I continue to develop related documents in nursing for elderly person. And at the time, I have been reading the documents related to the Older People Association. I was impressed how important the Older People Association is for the older people. At that time too, I am a member of Provincial WCC, that mean Provincial Woman and Child Consolidating Committee, that committee involved in vulnerable women and children in the province. So I made a meeting every month. So I purse all the issue of vulnerable women and children for our-the corner of my province. So I know the older women have many issue. See?

Angela Santillo
Yeah.

Ou Vanda
Yeah. And after realizing the importance of the Older People Association and I know many, many issue of the old person, I decided that when I retire, I would form Older People Association in my village. So on February-after I retire on February 14, 2018, my village OPA was established. Initially our membership of my OPA was 44, with 27 women. And now we have 87, 60 women. And on November 1, 2018, the acting constitution set up a Cambodia Aging Network. And on that occasion, I was honored to be elected to the Cambodia Aging Network Commission.

Angela Santillo
Wow. And this is all during your retirement. Shouldn’t you be relaxing during your retirement?

Ou Vanda
No, no.

Angela Santillo
Wow. So how are you helping the women in your group?

Ou Vanda
My OPA?

Angela Santillo
Yes.

Ou Vanda
Yes. I before, I am a former health worker. So I, I know main nurses these in the health center in the hospital. So I asked the nurses and health center to come to visit to check up our member health. Every three-every four months. I gotta take, take the blood pressure and the advice about how to take care of their health, etc.

Angela Santillo
Yeah. Did you always want to work with older people in your retirement?

Ou Vanda
Yes. You see, I have no children. You see, I have no children, but my husband have. I am his second wife. His first wife died by breast cancer. See, I married him. He has three children, but the eldest was die. Now, he has two children. So I have for me, I have no children. So I think- I feel lonely.

Angela Santillo
So it gives something to do and people to take care of and a mission.

Ou Vanda
Yes.

Angela Santillo
Is this kind of problem common in Cambodia, with the elderly? Like people not getting health services, not having family. Is that a common situation?

Ou Vanda
Yeah. The big problem for the elderly people in our country is about health. But now I try to advocate with the provincial health department. And now, it had the better than before because many health center provide health services to the elderly people, without paying. Except for provincial hospital, they take money from the patient.

Angela Santillo
Oh, got it. Do most of the people you work with not have children to help take care of them? Or do they have-do they have families who help them or are these people who are mostly alone?

Ou Vanda
Many, many of them stay alone and some of them live with her children, for their mother and a father who their parents go to find work in another country. Like, Thailand or Malaysia. The children live with the older people. So it’s very difficult to take care of small children, you see? We have not enough money to spend for her life and for her grandchildren. You see?

Angela Santillo
Are they mostly taking care of their grandchildren while their children are away?

Ou Vanda
Yeah.

Angela Santillo
Oh, so they’re like also working a lot, not having a lot of care themselves, and watching lots of small children.

Ou Vanda
Uh huh.

Angela Santillo
Right, over there? So like the elderly are watching small children while their kids are away?

Ou Vanda
Yes.

Angela Santillo
So they’re very busy.

Ou Vanda
Busy.

Angela Santillo
Very busy.

Ou Vanda
Especially for the woman. You see the men-

Angela Santillo
Because they’re the main person to watch over all the grand kids?

Ou Vanda
Yeah, they are very busy to take care of small children. She has no time to know about another- all the information about everything like about health. And sometimes the Ministry of Health show them how to take care of themselves about health. On TV, on radio. But they have no time to listen or to watch TV. There’s so many information she didn’t know for the women. But for the men, they have some time. They have time because in the morning they go to take a coffee at the coffee bar. Yeah, you see have many- have enough time for the men, the old men, but for the women no. From morning till night she busy, busy, busy. Take care of this, clean house, she’s busy.

Angela Santillo
She’s cleaning, she’s cooking, she’s taking care of all the children. She comes very last, everyone way ahead of her. So are the elderly women in your community the ones who have the most health problems?

Ou Vanda
Oh yes. You see, I say in my OPA, my Older People Association, that we are 87 member. All of my member, they had three cancer problem. But now two of them pass away and left one. She has a cervical cancer. Another one had the hypertension high blood pressure, diabetes, and arthritis.

Angela Santillo
Yeah. Arthritis.

Ou Vanda
Yes. So many, many, many problem of the health. But yes, even with health disease like this they cannot stop working. See?

Angela Santillo
Yeah. So does it help them to have another- to be connected to other elderly people, to be in a group so everyone learns about health together? Does that help them?

Ou Vanda
Yeah. Oh well you see, our member help each other. You see?

Angela Santillo
Yeah.

Ou Vanda
When there’s someone ill and another came to visit them and some of them take food or take a meal or take something else to the member that had the problem. You see?

Angela Santillo
Yeah. So you’re, you’re helping build a family.

Ou Vanda
Yeah.

Angela Santillo
That everyone in your group is a community, it’s a family, they’re there for each other, they help each other out.

Ou Vanda
Yeah. And now I asked our local authority, I mean the Chief of the District…I don’t know what that called. The Chief of District-

Angela Santillo
Yeah, that makes sense.

Ou Vanda
Yes. So I, I asked him to establish another OPA in another village. You see, and I believe because in my district, have only one OPA in my village. So I asked them, the Chief of our District to develop-to establish another OPA in the another- the seven village because OPA can help the member help each other. You see?

Angela Santillo
Yeah. It’s continuous, constant support. Constant help. It makes people happier and improves their health. They get information. Well, is there anything else you want to say? Or any other part of your story that you wanted to tell?

Ou Vanda
Oh, you see many older people in my country have many problem. Some of them, some of them was locked in the house when their children go to work.

Angela Santillo
They’re locked in the house?

Ou Vanda
Yeah, locked house in the house. Yes.

Angela Santillo
Really?

Ou Vanda
Yes. And some- some of them have the dementia. So she go everywhere, so her relative put the chain-the chain on her her leg. Yes, yes. And some of older people, they have children, but they not take care of her. And she has a chronic disease like high blood pressure, like tuberculosis, like diabetes. One or two of them hanged herself because no one take care, no one appreciate them. Left her alone.

Angela Santillo
Yeah.

Ou Vanda
And this true story. An old lady, now she passed away. She had-she is 94 years old and she has only one son. You see? And her son of high rank in the soldier but I don’t want to say about it. And he left her at the pagoda and a man take care her. Give some food and something else to her. And one day when she passed away, the man called to her son and tell him that his mother passed away. You see? The son say that he’s busy. He cannot come to make her funeral. And he said that the man can do everything for the mother. He didn’t come. And I am leader of an OPA and I know that lady and I asked the provincial woman affair in my province and many people come to provide their money to make a funeral for her. But in the- you see in my country we burn the bodies. Her son didn’t come to join it. But another one, that the women when he was alive, and he offered some money, some food for her, he shaved his hair, and put the black and white cloth to do the funeral for her. Not her son. This is the real story.

Angela Santillo
That’s really- that such a- I mean it’s really sad that the son couldn’t be there. But it’s also so wonderful to see the community come around and give money for the funeral and people who weren’t her family treat her like family. So, but that’s really well-what do you hope for the future of the elderly people in Cambodia?

Ou Vanda
Yes. Our elderly people will become better, better than before because our Prime Minister make policy for the elderly and that now are all over the country- all over my country know about the policy and that they decided to make our policy become a-

Angela Santillo
Reality.

Ou Vanda
Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Angela Santillo
Yeah, that like it’s-it’s time to treat elderly people with respect, give them their health, you know let them live better in their old age and make that a policy. Well thank you so much. Is there anything else you want to say? Or if you’re good, I’m good.

Ou Vanda
Yeah, you’re welcome. I’m very honored that you want to know about my opinion, about my life.

Angela Santillo
Now there’s a group called Cambodia Aging Network. It’s comprised of about 18 organizations. It has over 16,000 members, and an honor of International Day of Older Persons, they are asking the government to provide pension and free health services to any citizen over the age of 75 years old. And Vonda is going to be celebrating with an event in her province. She’s going to be with other members and this network- well local members of this network. And on behalf of those members, she’s inviting the Ministry of Social Affairs to attend, so she can ask them to help give the elderly people what they need. Now let’s move from Cambodia into the Philippines.

Rizal Balatbat
(Clip of radio program in Filipino.)

Angela Santillo
Now you just heard we Rizal Balatbat on his radio show Senior Citizens TIPS and TIPS stands for “time for information and public service.” Since 2017, he’s been associated with COSE and COSE is definitely another acronym you should know. So COSE, Coalition of Services of the Elderly. They work with older persons, especially the poor and the marginalized, to uphold their rights while respecting cultural diversity, nurturing their potential, and recognizing them as a significant sector. Now, I was able to interview Rizal at 10pm New York time, which was 9am in the Philippines and he currently lives on a farm. So what you’re about to hear in the background of this audio is what a farm in the Philippines sounds like at 9am in the morning,

Rizal Balatbat
My name is Rizal Matias Balatbat from the Philippines and right now I am 72 years old. My wife is a retired teacher and I have three kids, all professionals. Right now I am very busy with a variety of senior citizen associations. ASCA incorporated, we call it ASCA ensure. A-S-C-A, advice in a coastal town of this association. And I am also the Vice President of our local senior citizens association. And anything more you want to know for me?

Angela Santillo
I think that’s perfect. So then I’ll just go ahead and ask you, what is one moment that changed everything for you?

Rizal Balatbat
Well, as I had mentioned, I am very busy right now with our associations. So these associations, has changed many things in my life.

Angela Santillo
When did you start your work with the association?

Rizal Balatbat
Well, upon arrival or returning to the Philippines for good from abroad or not- or in the United Arab Emirates, particularly in Dubai, I was invited one time in a meeting of senior citizens in our place. And this is the time where I was selected as one of the leaders of this association. So from that time on, I have been busy with this association, particularly in advocating or doing for the welfare of the senior citizens. That the benefits, the rights, and privileges of our senior citizens are enjoyed and received.

Angela Santillo
Were you, before this period, working in any kind of activism? Or was that something that you were focused on before you retired?

Rizal Balatbat
Oh yes, of course. Right now, not only in this association I am busy but also in farming because my parents were farmers. And now upon my retirement, besides being busy with the associations, I am also working in the farm. And I have-I was able to buy a portion of rice land and also inherited from my parents.

Angela Santillo
Wow. And you weren’t a farmer before this. I mean, it sounds like you grew up in farming, but what was your profession before your retirement?

Rizal Balatbat
Before I was a teacher in the public elementary schools,

Angela Santillo
Still working to help people, educate people, be their advocate.

Rizal Balatbat
Yes that, yes. And also right now, I’m also very busy in the radio program, I h\am a regular host for the senior citizens. Most of the topics or the segments of the episodes are about the senior citizens. So, we are trying to emphasize that we are trying to promote the welfare of our senior citizen, not only in our local place, but throughout the Philippines. So in this radio program, we were able to disseminate information about the senior citizens, particularly the policies, the priorities of our senior citizens. So through the radio we were able to disseminate information- as I mentioned in the Philippines and also the Filipinos who are senior citizens. Not only here, throughout the world because, you know, through the radio, they were able to listen to us.

Angela Santillo
What has surprised you about doing the radio show, like reaching senior citizens? What has surprised you about that kind of work?

Rizal Balatbat
Oh, yes of course. In radio broadcasting we have- but before I forget, this program in radio broadcasting, this is a project of the COSE or Voice Philippines. That is COSE, Coalition of Services of the Elderly. I had so many things to thank for COSE because through COSE I was able to update my experience, gain more experiences, and be able to learn from them because of the different training, seminars, workshop that I have attended through the COSE. And of course, because of COSE I was able to become a radio broadcaster, a radio host of a radio program like Senior Citizens TIPS: Time for Information and Public Service. These are some of the things that have changed my life and though the radio program I have a wider network.

Angela Santillo
And how are you helping them? Like what kind of issues or topics are discussed on your radio program?

Rizal Balatbat
Oh yes, many things that we are discussing. Especially through the program. we were able to enhance the social protection program. Particularly the social pension and the field health because in the social pension in the Philippines, social pensions we were able to say that there are some senior citizens now who are receiving some sort of help, financial help from our government through the social pension. But unfortunately right now, there are only very few, those that we call the indigent senior citizens are receiving cost benefits from our government. So there are still many who are in need of support of our government. So that’s why right now we are advocating for the universal social pension, which means that if this is passed through our Congress everybody once they reach the age of 60 and above, regardless of economic status, whether they are rich or middle class, they will be able to receive tax benefits or special from our government. And in the field health program, before only certain senior citizens are receiving the field health or Medicare from our government. But because good advocacy of the senior citizen organizations like our organization, ASCA, through the help of COSE or The Voice Philippines, we were able- the government was able- was forced to make the law 10645 or the mandatory period coverage for a senior citizens. Which means all the senior citizens now, regardless of economic status, are registered in the field health or National Health Insurance Program for our government. So it doesn’t matter if you are rich, if you are poor. As long as you are senior citizens, you are now receiving health insurance or field health program of our government.

Angela Santillo
And that’s a new development.

Rizal Balatbat
Correct. Yeah.

Angela Santillo
So, on your show, were you working to get more attention to this issue? Or were you hearing from people and they were really expressing that they needed this?

Rizal Balatbat
Oh, yes, of course. Today’s programs we were able to give information, disseminate information to our fellow senior citizens through different means. Like, for example dialogue, surveys, presentations. And also if we have problems with our senior citizens, we were able to go to our stakeholders like our local officials or municipal councils. And because of the many things that we learned through the COSE, we were able to advocate more, not only nationally but even to our local community or our local government.

Angela Santillo
Did you ever see yourself doing this kind of work? Like doing media, doing a radio show. Has any of this been a surprise to you based on your previous careers?

Rizal Balatbat
Before I was not expecting that I will become a radio broadcaster or radio host. So because of the show radio hosting, my self esteem and self confidence was uplifted or I’m gaining more now trust in myself. I can now facilitate, I can now lecture because of the training seminars, programs, workshops that I was attending through the sponsorship of the COSE. Which is a non-government organization like our senior citizens organization.

Angela Santillo
Yeah. Is your radio show the only one of its kind? Are there other radio shows that are targeting this population?

Rizal Balatbat
Right now, no. That is the only radio program that we hear at the moment. The Senior Citizens TIPS: Time for Information and Public Service. Which is aired every other Saturday and on 91.9 Bright FM DWBL and also on our Facebook account. This is a one hour program every other Saturday. So like today’s Friday in the Philippines and tomorrow we will have a radio program for one hour in the radio station 91.9 Bright FM.

Angela Santillo
Now, I’m not sure about the format of your radio show but I’m assuming because you are serving the senior citizen population that you do you hear from your listeners. Are you talking to other senior citizens on your radio show?

Rizal Balatbat
Oh, yes. This show-during the show there are so many comments and many questions that we are receiving and we were able to answer these questions on the air. Even through the text lines and messages and also Facebook online.

Angela Santillo
Is your global audience coming from being on Facebook?

Rizal Balatbat
Yeah, yeah, yeah. They can watch us on our Facebook account, which is the Senior Citizen TIPS.

Angela Santillo
Wow. What has really surprised you about talking to other senior citizens and talking about policies?

Rizal Balatbat
So there are some positive experiences and there are some positive questions or positive messages, but there are also negative messages. Like for example, right now through the social pension as I mentioned before, there were only very few senior citizens who are receiving this cost benefits or this services from our government. Only the indigent people are now receiving. So then they are asking, “Why only very few? What about me? When will I receive this the pension from our government?” So this is a very tough question sometimes because we want to help everybody. But the budget of social pension right now is always in very small amount so we cannot please everybody.

Angela Santillo
So what do-how do you answer that question when people say, you know, “How come I can’t get this?”

Rizal Balatbat
Well, we are just explaining to them that because it is according to the law. It’s only- we will just give our explanation to them, maybe enlighten them why it is like this. Because that’s why we are now advocating the universal social in the Philippines. We are lobbying our Congress, we are lobbying to our local officials, we are now lobbying to everybody so that our Congress, our lower house and our Senate will pass this universal social program so that everybody will receive a pension from our government.

Angela Santillo
Random question, but do you consider yourself an activist?

Rizal Balatbat
No, not really.

Angela Santillo
Really?

Rizal Balatbat
Yeah. I’ll say that we are not like that. But we are becoming activists only for the senior citizen, not against the government but to help our fellow senior citizen. Like for example, for those who are very poor, because there are still many poor senior citizens in the Philippines, and they need help from our government. That’s why we are doing this. Actually right now, we have passed resolutions to our local municipal council to be included in the local special offices. For example, the local development council. So that’s why we asked for accreditation and we ask for inclusions in the associations and planning because we are- we believe that senior citizens through their experiences they can share, or people can give their opinion or ideas during the local planning for the development of our community or our municipality.

Angela Santillo
And this work-I think whenever I hear people working with the government or working on social issues, it always sounds like very exhausting. You know, it’s a lot of information to take in. It’s a lot of people’s stories. Do you find this work tiring or exhilarating? Or how do you feel about doing this work? Because it’s a lot to take on, you know, it’s advocating for a lot of people. It’s helping a lot of people.

Rizal Balatbat
I’m glad you asked that. As I said, this is pure volunteerism. We work for our senior citizens, just so that we can help them without expecting any return in any financial reward. But we are gaining- if you are asking about what we gain for doing these things. So this is very challenging and very rewarding. How? Because the thing is we can help our fellow senior citizens. I was able to meet so many fellow senior citizens from different areas, from different towns or regions and provinces in the Philippines. Even internationally because last January I was in Kenya for the Indaba. I represented the senior citizens in the Philippines for the conference in Nairobi.

Angela Santillo
Oh, wow. Now that you’ve, you know, you’ve had all this experience I just want to ask for you personally, why are you passionate about helping senior citizens?

Rizal Balatbat
Oh, yes. A very nice question. I feel rewarded. I feel happy in helping this fellow senior citizen when I don’t get anything in return except that we’re able to see them happy. If I see them happy, I’m also getting happier because through my- small thing I can do for them, I’m rewarded. That I’m getting happier for this. If I can get help to them, I am feeling more comfortable and happier because helping other people unselfishly that is very rewarding.

Angela Santillo
Yeah. And then just one final question, hearing the stories of other senior citizens, what advice would you give other people in regards to supporting and helping senior citizens in their communities?

Rizal Balatbat
Well, for our senior citizens, my advice to them is to keep working with our fellow senior citizens. So you can do or if you can do something that only-if you are helping your fellow citizen or any anybody, you are just like helping the whole community. Because these are vulnerable people, these are marginalized people, but if you can make them happy you can also make the community happy because these people are part of the community. So to my fellow senior citizens, share whatever you can, share to our fellow men. Do whatever you can do, even for other people. There are now many seniors citizens like me who are doing this. If you can do it, you can share your experiences, that’s better. So let’s make our remaining life very meaningful by helping other people, particularly the fellow senior citizens.

Angela Santillo
As you can imagine, there are a lot of links for this show, so get ready. To learn more about COSE, visit cose.org.ph. To learn more about Help Age Cambodia, helpagecambodia.org. And you can find Voice at voice.global and you can follow them on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. And Then Suddenly podcast is also on Instagram and Facebook and you can find me at my website andthensuddenlypodcast.com. Now the links for all of these organizations, including the link for Rizal’s radio show, is going to be included in the show notes for this episode. So go ahead and check those out. All right, I thank you so much for listening. Happy International Day of Older Persons.

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Writer | Corporate Storyteller | Host of the And Then Suddenly podcast

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