Topic Background

Celebrity branding, also known as celebrity advertisements and celebrity endorsement is more than a famous person just showing off a product. It is a detailed technique and a form of advertising campaign, also known as a marketing strategy, that is used by different types of brands, companies, or non-profit organizations which involves celebrities or anyone with a big amount of following base that uses their social statues to promote a product, service, or even raise awareness on a specific issue. This whole idea of celebrity branding has been going on for decades. It dates all the way back to the 1760s and from then on, it has only continued to grow and become more popular, especially with all the technology that has been created over the years. Celebrity endorsements are all over social media, billboards, radio stations, and television, which is the most popular one. In all of history, the Super Bowl is the only time where so many companies try and air their celebrity endorsements because they know millions are watching. On the news, it was said that too many of these celebrity endorsements can be very risky to a company and can lead to overexposure and bad representation, if not done well. If the celebrity makes a mistake in their lives, it goes back to the company and if you use a celebrity-endorsement strategy, you increase the potential for your brand to reach the conscious mind of the consumer. Everyday, whether one notices or not, millions of people are seeing these celebrity endorsements and if the ad sticks out to them, they will question themselves if they want to purchase that product. It is significant to this specific audience that they trust the celebrity endorsement and it also important to these companies that they choose the appropriate celebrity to represent their brands and get the most profit they can get. If the audience does not like the ad, the company does not make money and ultimately, that is their goal.

When someone thinks about celebrity branding, they do not often think about the psychological concepts behind it. For example, classical conditioning is very important when it comes to these advertisements. Classical conditioning is a psychological concept based on experiments conducted by Ivan Pavlov in the early 1900s. It’s a learning process that occurs when a conditioned stimulus (sound of a bell) is paired with and precedes the unconditioned stimulus (sight of food) until the conditioned stimulus alone is good enough to elicit the response (salivation in a dog). This relates to celebrity branding because when a celebrity, which is the unconditioned stimulus, endorses a brand, the conditioned stimulus, it creates either a negative or positive response about that brand, which is the conditioned response. Not many people fully understand that there truly is so much psychology that goes behind producing celebrity endorsements but once they do, the idea of celebrity branding can be looked at more with expertise and also very differently.

Lastly, although I am familiar with this topic of celebrity branding, I still have yet to learn more about it and become the expert I can potentially be. Throughout the semester, I hope to answer many of my questions about this topic. For example, what are the actions a company takes when the celebrity they have chosen to represent their product does something bad and it is now all over the news for the world to know about? Does the company automatically change their representative? Another example of a question I would like answered is how do companies choose a celebrity? What are the questions they ask themselves when choosing the appropriate person. Also, is there really a significant difference when a celebrity is involved in an advertisement? Is it not possible for products to sell without using someone famous to sell the product, promote a service, or raise awareness? These are the type of questions that I would like to know the answer to so that I can fully understand and hopefully become an expert on this topic of celebrity endorsements and celebrity branding.

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