Earlier this fall we invested in HERO Protein, a Shanghai-based early-stage startup creating plant-based meat alternatives for the Chinese market. In this post we’ll talk briefly about why but the TL;DR: enormous impact upside, great market timing and well-positioned products and team.

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It is no news that reducing meat consumption and replacing it with plant-based alternatives is one of the most effective ways that consumers can reduce their carbon footprint. …


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A few months ago we, Anna & Erik, published our own personal stories about why we decided to start Trellis Road. The common denominator, and the entire fundament of Trellis Road, is a strong personal motivation to contribute to a better food system in ways that positively affects climate change, environmental issues, human health and animal welfare.

Our recent investment in Bond Pet Foods is a testament to this ambition, showcasing that there are great investment opportunities in startups tackling not only one but multiple of these different challenges.

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When we started deep diving into different potential investment areas this spring we highlighted the pet food industry as highly relevant from an impact perspective. Not only is it a significant component of the meat industry, incorporating the problems of animal suffering and killing as well as contributing largely to global greenhouse emissions, but it’s also one where it’s surprisingly difficult to find better alternatives. …


Me and my co-founder Erik Byrenius recently launched Trellis Road, a new initiative investing in and supporting pre-seed and seed stage high-impact foodtech startups. Me and Erik have spent the last few months deep-diving into the global, but especially European, high-impact foodtech and agtech investment landscape and in a series of blog posts we’ll share some highlights of what we’ve learned. In this first part we’ll focus on key takeaways from publicly available data and reports about the investment landscape.

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There’s a ton of great information available out there, but in this post we’ve focused on data from these three…


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One thing that I’ve learned over the last years is that startups really can succeed. The three friends that have nothing but a crazy idea, a bold vision and perhaps a lousy pitch deck today, can actually turn out to have changed industries, consumer behaviors and consequently even societies in ten years from now.

Obviously I knew this on a theoretical, conceptual, level earlier too, but just as the phenomenon in sports psychology where an athlete gets to train with the more senior athletes who are competing, and perhaps even winning, in the Olympics — it’s not until you see it you that you actually understand it. …


A few months ago me and my two co-founders Dennis and Victor came to the decision to stop building Greta.

The irony is that if we had been able to get a preview of the 6 months leading up to this decision back when we started out, we would probably have jumped with pride and excitement. Things were finally falling into place, and it felt like the world was moving our way; we onboarded more and bigger users, we had interest from some of the worlds’ largest media and retail companies, we joined the amazing Heavybit community. We were offered additional financing by amazing investors, and we had built a fantastic team that made it a true joy to work. …


The Internet is scaling faster than current infrastructure can keep up. Here is why we care and what we’re going to do about it.

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Greta.io is a Swedish company, and our vision is to upgrade the Internet for everyone, everywhere. This is how we see the future of the Internet and how we can improve that future.

Right now, one thing is abundantly clear. Over the past 25 years, the Internet has evolved by leaps and bounds. It started as a small network of connected university servers where researchers shared text documents, and it transformed into one of the most critical building blocks of modern democratic societies.

For example, access to the Internet accelerates the formation of new ideas.
It boosts economic growth. It provides useful knowledge and information to people around the world every single day. It enables you to meet people who would be otherwise impossible to find. It allows journalists to spread important facts. …


Diane Greene, Senior VP Google Cloud opened the Google Next keynote on Day 1 by saying that she heard before entering the stage that the queue on Howard Street outside Moscone Center in San Francisco stretched across blocks. When being part of Google Next, it’s undebatable how highly Google holds it’s cloud business and what an important part it’s playing in the development of the company. Listening to Greene, but also Google CEO Sundar Pichai it is obvious that Google plans to further invest heavily in infrastructure in order to improve Internet with focus on performance and security.

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Greene highlighted a few examples of customers that have successfully integrated Google Cloud Platform as the basis of their infrastructure, including the success of Pokémon Go. For context, this event takes place just a few weeks after it was announced that Snap Inc had entered into a deal with GCP worth $1.6 billion of cloud services, spread over 4 years. Considering Snap’s revenue is said to be just above $400 million in revenue during 2016, equaling the amount that they’ve committed to paying Google in order to provide the infrastructure on which Snap is running. Another example of how GCP are investing in their relations with content heavy media companies that was presented at stage was the partnership with Disney. Michael White, CTO & SVP, Disney Consumer Products and Interactive Media spoke to Greene about how they were shifting their operations to GCP. …


Before founding my startup Greta, I’d heard many nightmare stories about never-ending fundraising processes and evil investors. So guess my happiness when I, only 4 months after quitting my full-time job, had signed investment documents from a bunch of angel investors in my hand. And not just any angel investors; a whole group of kind, smart and experienced people whom we really wanted to work with.

When I mention to others that we love our investors, I’m more often than not met with surprise. As I talk to a lot of people thinking about starting their own companies, who are finding the part with investors tricky or even scary, I’ve decided to share some personal thoughts and experiences on the matter. …

About

Anna Ottosson

Investor at Trellis Road

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