Dear Everybody in Entertainment
Melanie Zoey Weinstein
1852

Hollywood is not to blame. It is the movie-goers! Movie directors would not be so powerful without the millions earned from people paying to watch those movies. And half the movie-goers are women! I am not a powerful person, but I have always expressed my power by refusing to pretend I’m “grown-up” enough to appreciate the “art” of a movie that turns me into a voyeur.

Men are by nature voyeurs. That is why they are consumers of pornography. Every movie with a sex scene is voyeuristic. (No-where else is it considered OK to make people watch other people having sex. Only in the movies.) The women who, since the 60s, defended the movie-makers’ “right to free speech” are the hand-maidens of the misogynists.

All the women who, since the 60s and 70s, sniggered at the “prudeness” of women who are embarrassed by sex scenes in movies — are the misogynists’ hand-maidens. And in my recollection those women bullied, yes, bullied, any woman who, unlike me, was too shy to express her opinion.

When I expressed horror at my brother’s misogyny, he was truly wide-eyed with surprise: “but women like sex as much as we (men) do? I am doing her a favour! We are the same!” He truly believed he was showing his political correctness by seeing women as the same as men in all things (including sex). And that there was something wrong with me, or perhaps I’d just not caught up to the modern age where men and women are the same and women can enjoy sex exactly like men. So if a woman doesn’t like what he likes, or is uncomfortable about the voyeurism in movies, there must be something wrong with her.

Where do you think he got that idea from?

From the women who meekly tagged along. The 50% of movie-goers whose movie-tickets made Harvey Weinstein rich and powerful.

The world condoned Louis CK’s endless prattle about masturbation — so why would it be wrong doing so in real life? And men would never be offended by that. They can talk endlessly about sex. So why are the women offended? Aren’t we all the same?

Women were never powerless. I have always been powerful enough to express my opinion, even though that meant ridicule and condemnation (so now I know who my friends are), even though it meant I’ve had to lead a very humble existence in relative poverty.

It is not the fault of the men that women still look to men for permission to have an opinion of their own.

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