Get Specific

I work for a university. I work in Career Services, and students hardly respond to anything we send them — emails, texts, alerts, push notifications. We even have automatic voicemails we send them.

There are probably a lot of reasons why. But one of those reasons is because we send the same email to hundreds and thousands of students.

We’re not specific. “Send this email to all business majors.” “Send this alert to all graduating seniors.”

Who cares? We’re not specific. Students don’t want to feel lumped in. I wouldn’t.

The answer is to be specific. Imagine getting an email back when you were in school: “Hey, you! You’re a 3rd year Hispanic English major who lives in campus with a 3.5+ GPA and part of the Arts & Letters college. This event is specifically for you!”

I might still not go. But I’d definitely read it.

The same goes for your goals. “Learning Korean” isn’t a goal. “Write a book” isn’t a goal. “Own my own business isn’t a goal.”

“I want to be able to order breakfast, lunch, dinner, and drinks at a Korean BBQ restaurant in Korean. I also want to ask for directions to a location both in the city and in the country. Finally, I want to have a 5 minute conversation with a stranger about my likes and dislikes, and find out what their’s are. i want to have all this done in 90 days.”

Or this one. “I will write 20,000 words by June 1st. I will trim this down to 10,000 words, and I will publish an eBook using that information. I will start by writing 500, then 1,000, then 3,000, then 5,000, then 10,000, then 20,000. The book will be all about how to travel to a foreign country and live successfully making less than I used to.”

These are goals. They are specific. They are SMART goals: Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, and Time-bound.

Get morespecific.

Anthony

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