Soon I will complete a full year since formally graduating with a Master of Business Administration from the University of Oxford. Most things about that sentence still are hard to believe sometimes but it’s certainly prompted a lot of reflection.

Oxford has a way about holding seemingly contradictory truths simultaneously. It’s both inspiring and disheartening. Majestic and barbaric. Friendly and intimidating. Wise and detached from reality. Effortless and challenging. Exclusive and luring. The business school’s modern existence itself can feel like a contradiction against the backdrop of the centuries old wider institution. …

Drivers and Factors Relating to Human Movement: Vulnerability and Capacity

Though human movement is nothing new, its influencing drivers and factors continue to be dynamically evolving and interconnected. Human movement can be thought of as a spectrum where voluntary movement, migration, is on one end and forced movement, displacement, is on the other. Knowing this, movement is usually neither completely forced nor completely voluntary — often it may be some combination of the two.

Based on ODI’s 2017 report on the matter, two drivers feed into an individual’s or community’s consideration to move: vulnerability and capacity. Vulnerability is the susceptibility of people and the systems they depend on to suffering…

Last month I had the opportunity to sit in on a class taught by Dr. Cameron Hepburn of the Smith School of Enterprise and the Environment at Oxford University. Despite his impressive, high-level and well-rounded achievements (IPCC author, think tank founder, angel investor to name a few), his teaching style was refreshingly approachable and understandable. It’s encouraging to have such knowledgeable academics be so attuned to bringing practitioners’ lens to the classroom.

In no particular order, below are learnings from the class I found most interesting. I should note that the dynamics of how energy/power providers deal with various levels…

It’s hard to escape the discourse on climate change these days. It finally seems to be the talk of the town — as it should be. Too much time has been wasted in the false “debate” of whether climate change is real. It is. So with the narrative finally moving productively forward, let’s talk about an important detail: how on earth are we going to pay for addressing (and ideally reversing) climate change? The answer is actually not so out of reach. …

Aparna Shrivastava

Climate Finance • Emerging Markets • Renewable Energy • Views are entirely my own •🏳️‍🌈🥑🎤🎸✊🏾💃🏾

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