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Having taught over 100 hours of full online business school course’s over the past few months, I thought it might help to share some of the findings and learnings. But it’s not what you think. The bulk of the conversation these days is directed at the “obsolete format, delivery, and standards of higher education institutions and particularly on accessibility and pricing”. Not all the discussion is sterile, but instead of pointing at the easy (apparent) targets, one should consider all the stakeholders involved (under the waterline) and take a closer look at what really goes on during an online session.

Before going further, this concerns voluntary online courses vs. …


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It seems that every new app that launches brings with it the same promise — our way is the best way. The vigorously promoted “fresh perspective” is frequently very self-centered, which is understandable given the amount of work involved. Although many ventures do come up with some novel approaches and efficient new functionalities, the vast majority fail to apprehend the principle hurdle that lies between their product and a new customer. I call it a “leap of faith.”

The first assumption for these innovative companies is the ease of changing of habits but as Ryan Holiday puts “ very few want to do the work to make those habits a reality”, and most organizations are equally guilty of imagining they will just magically develop once people use their app, especially without any added guidance on their behalf. But more importantly, on the path to product appropriation lies an ignored chasm that most teams do not grasp even when explained — what happens if your cool company folds, decides to sell or gets absorbed by a global behemoth? …


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I make it a point to participate in product surveys from startup apps I use. Over the recent years, they’ve significantly improved thanks to structure and intent (heightened by well-known startups sharing their process — like the widely shared version from Superhuman) and the UI/UX of innovative apps (like Typeform, Canny & Parlor). The vast majority take only a few minutes, can be used on multiple devices, and some even offer swag or coupons in exchange. But practically all fall short, and the reason is lack of context.

Context is one of the essential components of human communication. Context refers to the circumstances surrounding a message, including the setting, the value positions of the people, and the appropriateness of a message. This means considering your audience and implies understanding who they are. And this is where most product surveys fail. …

About

Andrew Paterson

Adj. Prof Innov & Entrepreneurship @kedgebs | SMB Workshops @nextstepsevents | Founder @birdseye_me | Writing book on #fundraising | Wonderful spouse & son