ASF Wallet Alpha 1 and Next Major Releases

In previous posts regarding the development status of the AppCoins protocol(ANU #2, #3 and #4) we’ve talked about the ASF Wallet and its functionalities. In the last ANU we’ve mentioned the release we made of the alpha version that was used as part of the MWC demo.

Alpha 1

This version was released to be used in the MWC demo, which consisted in having attendees playing a quick game where they would earn points. These points would then be converted into an amount of APPC and this amount would be transferred to the attendees wallets. We would ask the attendees to download this alpha version of the ASF Wallet and then would use it to transfer the amount of APPC for each attendee.

This version is composed by the basic functionalities of any Ethereum mobile wallet. The functionalities are the following:

Create/Import/Export accounts

Users can create new Ethereum accounts as they wish, either the first time the wallet is used or later. Importing an account can be done using the account’s private key or the keystore file. Users can import any number of Ethereum accounts they have.

Creation/Import of wallet in the app’s first use

Regarding exporting accounts, users can download and/or store the keystore file of an account and protect it using a password, if they wish. These keystore files can then be used to import the correspondent accounts in other wallets (mobile or desktop).

Wallet export encryption

Check balance

Users can have a clear view of their balance of the different ERC20 tokens they own. Although the default token is APPC, users can still see all the tokens they own, their value in US Dollars and variation in the last 24h.

ETH and ERC20 tokens screen

Automatic addition of tokens

Whenever users import accounts or when they receive transactions, the ERC20 tokens of which users own any amount (any amount larger than 0) are automatically added to the list of tokens. Users can still manually disable them from appearing in the My Tokens screen or manually add other ERC20 tokens by including the contract address of the token, its symbol and the number of decimals the token supports.

Manually adding ERC20 tokens

Send and receive transactions

Users can send tokens they own to other addresses, as well as receive tokens. Users can have a clear view of all the completed transactions (both incoming and outgoing) and their details. Regarding receiving transactions, users can also share their address via a QR code that is easily readable by other wallets.

Sending APPC
QR code encoding the wallet address

Provide feedback

Users also have the possibility, and are in fact encouraged, to provide feedback about the wallet by following our work in our Github repository and by opening issues whenever they believe they’ve found a bug.

Settings screen with Feedback section

There are also other minor functionalities but we consider the functionalities described above to be the basis of what a user expects from an Ethereum wallet. We will include more features in the upcoming versions.

Next major releases

There will be two important releases in the following months, which will provide more features to increase the adoption of Ethereum wallets (and actually of crypto wallets in general). Perhaps more importantly, they’ll contain and incorporate the flows of the first two use cases of the AppCoins protocol: In-App Purchases (IAP) and Mobile Advertising.

Alpha 2

The 2nd version of the ASF Wallet alpha will incorporate the flows needed for IAP. It will provide the interfaces for the communication between the wallet and the ASF SDK, as well as the logic to interact with the blockchain components of the AppCoins protocol. This version of the wallet will be released by the 21st of March.

The wallet will be able to catch an intent fired by the ASF SDK, which contains information about the item the user wants to buy, and also the addresses of the developer, the app store that installed the app with the ASF SDK integrated and the OEM that pre-loaded the app store in device. It will call the smart contract with the protocol logic using all this data, and the smart contract will be responsible by implementing the revenue share model and storing that information in the blockchain. For context, the revenue share model the AppCoins protocol wants to implement for the IAP is attributing 85% of the item price to the developer, 10% for the app store and 5% for the OEM. Storing this data in the blockchain makes it possible to later validate the transactions and the revenue split, if needed.

Alpha 3

This 3rd version will include another major use case of the AppCoins protocol: Mobile Advertising. This version of the wallet will be released by the 2nd of May.

The wallet will contain the necessary functionalities to compute the Proof-of-Attention (PoA), which proves that the user did indeed give attention to the app for at least 2mins, and to write it to the blockchain for future validation, if needed. The wallet may also include features to enable developers to create campaigns directly in the wallet.

Regarding the PoA, the ASF SDK (a different version than the one mentioned in Alpha 2 section, with more functionalities) integrated in the app will trigger the wallet for the computation of the PoA. Whenever a valid PoA is computed, the wallet will write it into the blockchain. Developers can then validate if the PoA provided for any given user matches the campaign created, if so they wish.

Conclusion

The next few months will contain important developments, both in the AppCoins protocol and also in the software products the ASF is providing to enable users, developers and app stores to interact with the protocol, such as the ASF Wallet and the ASF SDK.

Feel free to follow the development of the ASF Wallet in our Github repo and we encourage you to provide feedback.

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