I suppose one ought to congratulate the Rethugs. In George Santos they have found, or produced, a victorious candidate who may be an even bigger liar than 45, if that’s possible. And in Solomon Pena they have produced a politician who personally engineered the attempted murder of several political rivals. I guess he wanted to outdo the MAGA stalwart who tried to murder Paul Pelosi when he couldn’t find Nancy. Way to go, MAGAts, and savor the moment while you can, because your star will soon fall.

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Girls Trip. Much pulchritude on display, most notably in the person of Tiffany Haddish. But when you realize the scatology is the whole point, it’s time to eject the disc. Speaking of the Haddish character, she’s supposed to be cutely rambunctious, I guess. But the truth is she’s psychotic. Or, at best, dangerously unbalanced.

I’m happy for Howard Hawks, Rene Clair, and Leo McCarey that they’re not still around to see this stuff.

People who like GT probably also liked the Jerry Springer show and its imitators. And what Springer, that Jerry Rivers character, et. al. did not understand is that they were the biggest geeks on their shows.

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It seems to me that fascists — whether they call themselves Blackshirts, Freikorps, Brownshirts, LaRoucheites, SS, Gestapo, Proud Boys, Oath Keepers, or simply (trumpite) Republicans — are driven by a radical craving in relation to submission and dominance: They want to be both object and subject of infinite domination. Absolute fealty to the leader, absolute liberty to hurt, torture, and destroy any and all persons, principles, and institutions deemed inimical to the leader. You could, then, say that trumpism is the twisted offspring of a crypto-monarchist theism — which would make Cotton Mather, not to mention Torquemada, proud — and USAmerican individualism.

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Pygmalion, from 1938. It holds up. A thought: A lot of the humor in Monty Python came out of what might happen when different British types collide, the buttoned-up and the unbuttoned, the different socioeconomic classes, people from different regions and so forth. I’m wondering if Pygmalion was an influence, because that’s all there, albeit without the surrealistic absurdism. The scene where Eliza is presented to Mrs. Higgins, Freddy and his mother and sister et.al. is quite funny, and that comes out of Eliza speaking more or less frankly about her rough-and-tumble upbringing but in tones of upper-class politesse. “Not. Bloody. Likely.” Then again, maybe that’s just how British humor is, but both the G.B. Shaw of Pygmalion and the Python crew were a long way from Jane Austen.

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