I think the curatorial powers of Twitter should be trained on serious and thoughtful users and that they should be given the same treatment Twitter accords to celebrities
Updated 10/28/2015
Stephen C. Rose
61

I hope someone from Twitter has read Stephen Rose’s eloquent essay with the due seriousness it deserves. The curatorial bit that he writes here is important, IMHO.

Recently, I tried following a bunch of very active and interesting posters on Twittersphere. As the number of people I followed in total exceeded 1000, Twitter did not allow me to follow anyone else.

Notices such as this from Twitter is restrictive for me. I am prepared to browse and learn from my twitter stream, interact with people and posts that share my interests, and the more the better. As he writes, irrefutably, that Twitter is what you make of it. That goes true for every other social networking app we get to see out there, including Medium (which, again, has an intuitive approach towards “trolls”, if you will).

I do not see Twitter going away anywhere, if only, I see a great future, and it will continue to grow. More so, as expression engines such as Medium that allows for longer form of essays and interactive spaces rise in the future. Blogs are great, but they are still too isolated, and some of the other media outlets are quite restrictive if you’d like to break out of the close network trap. That said, there are obnoxious people in Twitter as they are everywhere. In Medium, their expressions are subdued by design, Twitter lets them express right away, so does Facebook. But there is also far too much meaningful conversations float around, and how best Twitter manages to bring them up to its “primary consciousness” layer is a space to watch.

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