Image for post
Image for post
Protest against De Blasio’s Bill (Source: New York Times)

New York City has one of the most diverse populations in the US. Through all of this diversity, have you ever wondered why it looks so different depending on where you go? Spanish Harlem has a majority Latinx population, Chinatown has a majority Asian population, and the Upper East Side has a majority white population.

The patterns in where people reside are also reflected in the public school system across New York City. You can’t really judge the city’s entire public school system because it is so vastly different depending on where you go. In some places, you’ll find schools with higher graduation rates, better infrastructure, more funding, and more overall resources, ensuring that students receive the best education possible. But, in a number of neighborhoods made up of underrepresented people, schools often have fewer resources, resulting in worse outcomes. After all, many low-income neighborhoods suffer from inadequate funding and inequitable distribution, explaining the disparity between rich neighborhoods like the Upper East Side and lower-income neighborhoods like Mott Haven. In addition, across the city, low-income students who cannot attend local private or charter schools are forced into more impoverished schools, perpetuating a cycle of inequality. …


How we can raise our voices to build a positive school climate.

Image for post
Image for post

As I sat there and looked around at the students that showed up noticing the nervousness in the air, although we all knew each other. In total, there were seven students that showed up and were from different grades, gender, and race. I tried to make it as diverse as possible so we could hear out more than one perspective of the student experience. One of the reasons why it’s so vital to make sure different perspectives are being heard is because even though we think we know what someone is experiencing, you can’t really look beneath the surface and see more than just the tip of the iceberg. Though our school is merely one hundred and thirty students, the general experience of someone born and raised in NH is different than the general experience of someone born and raised in China going to school in the North Country, NH. …


Image for post
Image for post
Mott Haven, South Bronx (Credit: BronxShots)

For me, it starts with the American Dream. The American Dream brought two hardworking, dedicated and optimistic individuals to the United States, specifically New York City. A place filled with dreams. The two were brought together, becoming parents to two first-generation daughters. For both, it’s been around twenty years since they first got here. Still, one thing remains the same. Restless eyes that manage to work many hours and envision a bright future, better than the one that could have been provided in their home country. It’s been around twenty-years, but life hasn’t gotten any better. This is the misconception of the American Dream. However, my parents keep reminding me of these things: “Don’t drop out of school”, “Keep studying”, “Get good grades”, “Be kind”, and “Be respectful”. …

About

Arli Moyao-Ramirez

Loves to try new things and take on any challenge. Passionate about making sure voices are being heard and encouraging others to join the cause

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store