Two weeks ago, Banksy beamed an image out to his eight million Instagram followers. It quickly did the rounds, being disseminated to the farthest reaches of the internet in the way only a Banksy image can (with the exception, perhaps, of dogs doing yoga). The photo — titled “My wife hates it when I work from home” — depicts nine graffiti rats running amok in the artists’ bathroom: a pertinent, trompe l’oeil masterpiece of dynamism and wit. The rat, Banksy’s trademark symbol, with its long-standing associations with the plague, is a more befitting totem of quarantine art than any other…


The asian art market is expanding in spite of itself. State censorship is still rife and restrictions are placed on what art can be made and exhibited. Public attitudes towards art are often fairly conservative, art that questions religion, the state and sexuality is still often unpopular, as it can be in the rest of the world. With this is mind, the cities below are noteworthy in their unwavering pursuit of inclusivity and desire to provide a platform for discussion and debate.

Seoul

Seoul is the largest city in Korea and the second most populated city in the world, with…


According to the United Nations, if we want to avoid a climate breakdown, carbon emissions must reach zero in the next 30 years. As we enter 2020, humanity’s baleful impact on the natural world is more tangible than ever: global warming is responsible for the melting of polar ice caps, rising sea levels and alarmingly regular extreme weather events. At Unit London we believe that art can and must continue to spread awareness of sustainable ways of living, whilst not shying away from critiquing modes of operating that have a deleterious effect on the environment; we believe more artists need…


What is Pop Art without Andy Warhol? The Pittsburgh-born artist defined the movement — conveying his fascination with celebrity culture and advertising through various mediums, his work deified the very same consumerism that it endeavoured to criticise. As his work blurred the lines between image and authenticity, Warhol, in turn, inaugurated himself as an American icon.

Warhol’s early work as a commercial illustrator consisted of light-hearted, whimsical drawings created by pressing fresh sheets of paper onto wet lines to make printed images. …


U-Greats casts a weekly spotlight on iconic creators who, over time, have informed and inspired both our own represented artists and the wider team here at Unit London.

Honoured by the Google Doodle on 30th April, the Japanese-American artist Ruth Asawa was renowned for her technically delicate sculptures. Despite battling racial and gender discrimination, Asawa became a notable art figure in the West Coast.

Asawa’s suspended sculptures are hyperbolic shapes, woven with wire, stone and bronze. The transparent mesh is an unconventional take on the bond between gravity and form — inspired by native Mexican basket-weaving techniques. …


This May, Unit London presents a new solo exhibition by British artist Jake Wood-Evans, Legacy & Disorder. The highly anticipated show centres around Wood-Evans’ fascination with the coalescence of past and present. The artist’s large-scale oil paintings and drawings convey an altered atmosphere: in his own words, Wood-Evan’s work is “a process of conflict with the ambiguous space between representation and abstraction.”

Legacy & Disorder follows Wood-Evans’ recent 2018 museum exhibition, REPORTRAIT, at the Nottingham Castle Museum and previous solo shows, Subjection & Discipline and Transitions with Unit London. His new body of work focuses on contextualising his fragmented historical…


Keith Haring embodied the essence of 1980s New York with his spontaneous, simplistic illustrations. Haring’s artwork made its debut in New York subway stations, with iconic images such as a barking dog or radiant baby populated across the walls.

The accessibility of Haring’s work actively propagated his mission to make art available for all, “many people could enjoy art if they were given the chance.” Haring was inspired by pop art, graffiti, Walt Disney and Dr Seuss; he was apt in refashioning these influential motifs into a medium for broadcasting issues such as racism, homophobia, drug addiction, and AIDS awareness.


U-Greats casts a weekly spotlight on iconic creators who, over time, have informed and inspired both our own represented artists and the wider team here at Unit London.

American Contemporary artist Joshua Hagler is known for his large-scale oil paintings depicting chaotic arrangements of human figures, often psychologically charged and in varying states of tension and conflict. Hagler interrogates his own middle American upbringing, the 19th-century exploration of North America, modern science fiction and the techniques and traditions of Italian religious art. He responds with grand paintings which present an excavation of time — layers of semi-realistic figures and historic…


U-Greats will cast a weekly spotlight on iconic creators who, over time, have informed and inspired both our own represented artists and the wider team here at Unit London.

Ai Weiwei is a Chinese artist and curator whose artistic pursuits are propelled by an unwavering, provoking activism. Critical of human rights violations on a political and global scale, Weiwei’s controversial works have addressed issues such as China’s corruption and the refugee crisis, among others. His pieces combine the minimalist and conceptual traditions, bearing semblance to the works of David Hammons and Robert Gober.

One of Weiwei’s most powerful installations, Sunflower…

UNIT LONDON

Unit London is a boldly independent, artist-led gallery space that challenges the art world by putting talent and ability before pretence and reputation.

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