The Real Reason People Are Obsessed With Minimalism

MMinimalism. The buzz word of 2016 that gained its popularity from making getting dressed a pleasant experience from its appealing simplicity and ease.

With influencers like Marie Kondo leading the pack of the minimalism movement, people everywhere are adopting the less-is-more lifestyle which now includes downsizing your home, your wardrobe, your carbon footprint and now, all of the unnecessary jumble your brain is forced to process due to information overload of both our online and offline worlds.

So, why are people becoming minimalists? If it isn’t obvious from the statement above, it’s because we want — scratch that — we need to de-stress. We need less “stuff.” As the organizational genius says, “An uncluttered environment mirrors an uncluttered mind.”

To that end…

Minimalism is nothing more than a simplistic attitude.

A simplistic attitude that can and should be applied to indisputably everything in our lives from the clothes we have outgrown to kitchen essentials gathering dust in our cupboards to the number of social media outlets we over-utilize.

Minimalism as it Pertains to Style

Referring back to the minimalist style development, you know, where people were bowed down to if they wore nothing more than a black pair of pants and white t-shirt? A time when you were labeled a diva, a drama queen, if you showed emotion, spoke louder than society’s standard of normal voice octave and wore anything but nude color nail polish?

Of course you do. Those were dark times for maximalists and expressionists.

Well, us consumers twisted this beautiful wardrobe editing concept and created a war between minimalists and maximalists. We equated this “dressing with less” phenom to size up the personalities and actions of people, deeming anyone who dare raise their eyebrows in concern as overreacting dramatists, and people who waltzed into parties wearing party dresses as conceited try-hards.

Trends, in a fashion sense, actually peeve me to the far corners of the Earth. How does a trend even come about? Anna Wintour decides she likes the off-the-shoulder look, so every major fashion retailer and several independent designers signal to their manufacturers to mimic the off-the-shoulder trend? Precisely. And three days later everyone is spotted wearing it — From toddlers to teenagers to millennials to senior citizens. Myself included! It is preposterous!

In a world that offers an overabundance of stuff and junk, we have to find a way to cut through the clutter and silence the noise that’s breaking our eardrums. Trends are supposed to be there to guide us with what’s in this season and serve as a heads up for what’s expected of the market, which I appreciate. But when that imitation is just that, an imitation, everything about it becomes cheap. Imitation might be the greatest form of flattery, but when it’s redundant across every city, industry and individual shopping at Asos and Chanel alike — to put it in the words of me — we can’t.

That’s what we turned minimalism into — instead of acting as its own representation of what it set out to be, and letting people who were beginning to embrace the understated concept to do so at the leisure of their own interpretation — we turned it into a trend. Treated it like it was a pair of velvet sweat pants passing through 2006.

But the great news is we have recognized our blunder and are now entering an era I’d like to call New Age Minimalism, where no one is to be ostracized no matter their choice of letting their roots grow out to prove they are *natural,* or preference to wear mermaid sequin eyeshadow to define their identity.

Stay-at-home mothers using cloth diapers and CEO mothers who have day and night nurses, unite.

This is the idea, anyway.

New Age Minimalism

Now that we know minimalism is a lifestyle and not a momentary trend, the whole concept is given a renewed and seriously refreshed signification. New Age Minimalism is about so much more than the refinery of outfitting and curtailing of home goods.

It’s about downsizing our lives to feel better, to feel more in control of what we can and actually want to accomplish as opposed to feeling pressure to figuring it all out before the sun sets.

New Age Minimalism is about owning and being in charge of the life we’re living and the life we can’t wait to be living.

Minimalism Series Coming Soon to a Mobile Device Near You

Speaking from someone who gets anxiety if a commercial has too many colors, I feel like the minimalism movement speaks to me personally.

If you are someone who gets overwhelmed easily, gets irritated by middle-aged women wearing paisley dresses, seeing overstuffed shelves at the market or despises anything other than your car in your garage, keep up with my new Minimalism Series. In it, I will dissect every area of life that should be scaled down including material possessions, reading materials, iPhone task apps and feasibly the most important item to be organized— our minds.

So by the series end, we can understand what minimalism means to us as individuals rather than as a whole.

Thanks for reading!