The Never Ending (Mystery of The) Vagina

I know how mysterious the female anatomy is. First of all, I am a woman — Although being a woman doesn’t necessarily mean that you know about the female body. You just know more than the average male, and that doesn’t really say much, does it? — who spent years in the university studying women, in order to spend the rest of her life helping women.

So, you have to believe me when I tell you that the female anatomy is like an abstract painting; the use of every single part is conceptual. There are so many folds and protuberances and cavities and more folds, that you need to stop for a moment and look at it for a second in order to find the meaning of everything. Its also versatile. How many system of organs can produce and expel blood approximately once a month, produce and release hormones, grow a tiny human and give birth to it, release secretions, have self cleaning mechanisms, and give orgasms? Male genitalia on the other hand, is pretty self explanatory, with a quite simple system of organs on the inside. So, there’s no surprise that I receive so many questions that begin or end with any part of the female reproductive system.

Today, I will focus on— Pause for effect — the vaginal canal.

The myths and beliefs surrounding this tight canal are endless, and the most common misconceptions, are the assumption that:

  1. Vagina and uterus are one single long tube
  2. The end of this tube is somewhere deep inside the abdomen.

I never get tired of answering those questions, to be honest, and since I joined — And got addicted to — Quora, a whole new door opened and questions started pouring out. This question in particular, was asked by a person who doesn’t speak english as his/her first language — Neither do I, so give us a break — and in a few days, it became my most popular answer.


Where do men’s sperms go in the female body during sex when a girl doesn’t have a uterus?

“as i know that when men and female do sex at that time sperms thrown into woman uterus. but what happen if uterus is removed because of medical reason?”

Ok, let me start by saying this: No, semen never gets “thrown into woman uterus” as you mentioned.

Now, lets move on to anatomy. The vagina is a completely separate compartment connected to the uterus by something called cervix.

The cervix has a canal, as you can see from this picture. In reality, the cervical canal is a closed, tight passage, that’s covered by thick mucus most of the time, so its impossible for a man to deposit his semen directly into the uterus during an ejaculation.

So, where does it go?

After ejaculation happens (Without a condom, of course) semen is deposited in the exact same place, regardless of the fact that the woman may or may not have a uterus, and that place is the deepest point in the vagina.

When a woman has a uterus and a cervix, or just a cervix, that point its called “Posterior Vaginal Fornix” (There are different types of hysterectomies. A subtotal hysterectomy will leave the cervix intact. During a total hysterectomy, the cervix and the body of the uterus will be removed). When a woman doesn’t have a cervix (Again, the body of the uterus is irrelevant up to this point), that point is called “Vaginal Cuff”, as you can see here.

Semen creates a little pool in there, and from that point, 2 things can happen. One is gravity, so a portion will drip out of the vagina because of it. The portion that remains might be able to move into the uterus through the cervical canal, only if a woman is in her fertile days (So, for about a week, the only way into the uterus, is open), during the 3 remaining weeks of her menstrual cycle, the cervical canal will be closed by mucus, so semen will drip down completely.

The same principle applies to a woman without a uterus. The vagina will be closed every day instead of only 21 days, and so, semen will drip down until nothing is left.

Hopefully, that answered your question.


I can’t help but wonder if this belief that the vagina is a never ending cavity where you can basically go on an expedition is one of the many reasons why men have such a fixation with the size of their penises. Huh.

Women have their own version of this question too. It usually involves a tampon — Sometimes, a small sex toy with some type of string attached to it — and it starts with this horror story about this one woman that “…Had to go to the emergency room once because the string of the tampon came off and the thing got stuck inside her and they couldn’t pull it out!”. — In a more gruesome versions of the story, the tampon spends a indefinite period of time inside her, then she gets an infection, and dies a horrible death. — This story always follows the question “Does that happen?” — No, no it doesn’t.

But the biggest victims of these misconceptions are hysterectomized women. Either the woman or her partner will always ask about this at some point after their surgeries. They strongly believe that no canal will remain, or that from now on, their vaginas will be some sort of tunnel to a vast hollow space instead of, well, exactly the same as before.

In reality, the vaginal canal is only 7 centimeters long — Or 2.7 inches — and stretches up to 10 centimeters during intercourse — Or 3.9 inches. The uterus of a non-pregnant woman is as big as her fist — If you’re a woman, go ahead, look at your fist, I’ll wait — and lives deep inside the pelvic excavation.

Yeah, unfortunately, reality isn’t nearly as interesting as some people may think. Reading these articles might be a mistake. I’m basically killing all those magical fantasies where someone is going elbow deep into a willing woman. On a side note, unicorns aren’t real.

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.