Booking it in the Digital Age

How Digital Publishing Can Work for You

ORIGINALLY POSTED IN ABBES SPARKS

There has never been a more exciting time to promote an author and his/her new book then now in the digital age of social media. Yet, book promotion, as in any industry, is not without its challenges. Book marketing has changed a great deal from the glory days of established large publishing houses that infused thousands of dollars towards the promotion and publicizing of a new book by unknowns.

Today, authors have a myriad of choices when it comes to publishing and promoting their book— traditional publishing houses vs. self-publishing,

It’s not all about the book store anymore.

digitally or print-on-demand — which to choose? Each has its plusses and minuses. According to several new and established authors, the general consensus is the “different strokes for different folks” theory, or in this case different authors” applies perfectly! While the powerhouse traditional publishing companies like Random House and Simon & Schuster still thrive, today they mostly put their huge marketing and promotional dollars towards their established renowned authors or celebrities. Therefore, for the common or first-time author, they would more likely than not be left to their own devices for promoting and publicizing their book.

The ‘big guys’ are hesitant to take risks on unknown authors.

Self-publishing has increasingly become a very lucrative option for writers, especially for first-time authors. Since they largely have to market their own books regardless of which publishing method they choose, this seems to be the winning choice. Most self-publishers list their books on amazon.com, which helps promote and sell as well as offers authors tools to self-publicize at authorcentral.amazon.com, Bookbaby.com (sister site of CD Baby) is another site offering tools for self-publishers. The main reason why one would select self-publishing is due to maintaining creative control.

“I opted to self-publish to keep creative control and keep my own time. My book is a story I needed to tell, and tell it my way.” — Marc Tayer, author, Televisionaries

According to Marc Tayer, author of the newly published ‘Televisionaries’, “The mainstream publishers wanted to promote my book with the PR angle “50 Shades of Digital TV” and the university publishers wanted to print it as a textbook.” Neither of these options were ideal to me nor suited the book. I opted to self-publish to keep creative control and keep my own time”. My book is a story I needed to tell, and tell it my way.”

It’s a whole new world.

Here are a few topline Book/Author Promotion tips for marketers to help sell a client’s book when launched, whichever publishing method is chosen:

Create a strategic comprehensive traditional marketing plan and timeline for promotion of book launch.

Use Social Media Networks: Post, post and post. Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest and LinkedIn each have different audiences so make sure your posts complement each other but speak to the right groups. In the case of non-fiction, positioning your client as an expert in the field is key.

Blogging: create a blog for your client that complements the story line or facts in the book you are selling and share.

Book Signings/Events/Appearances: Create speaking events and book signings for the author; it’s an integral and necessary tactic for selling.

Create Promotions: Hold contests, incentives or discounts for purchasing a copy of the book via social media, local market radio and/or tv stations for a limited time.

Remember, whichever publishing avenue your client selects for his/her book, a blend of good old fashioned promotion and publicity stirred with social media and digital marketing is a sure winner for book ROI. Have a terrific Thursday. as

Abbe Silverberg Sparks is the Founder and CEO of Abbe Sparks Media Group, a boutique communications firm specializing in media relations, cause and social media marketing, branding and special events planning.

Posted in: Latest News, RFPalooza

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