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Pipedrive’s founders (left to right, from top): Ragnar Sass, Urmas Purde, Martin Tajur, Timo Rein, and Martin Henk

Estonian-born Pipedrive is something of a special investment for Atomico. Many of our team experienced first-hand the outstanding talent and entrepreneurial spirit of Estonia while working at Skype, including Niklas Zennström, co-founder of both Skype and Atomico. Skype had offices in Sweden and Estonia, and the majority of the team was in Estonia. Estonian talent was absolutely fundamental to the development and success of the business. We led the company’s series B in 2017 because we knew that the Pipedrive team, and Estonia, was capable of building something big.

Pipedrive was founded in 2010 with the aim of being the first CRM platform built by salespeople for salespeople, instead of sales managers, and we loved the contrarian approach they had. At that time, the majority of small businesses were using spreadsheets and complicated manual tools to manage their sales processes. While there were numerous established CRM solutions for the enterprise market, the CRM market tailored specifically for SMEs was untapped — and huge. Pipedrive provided a simple but powerful alternative. …


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Since the first protein-based drug was approved almost 40 years ago, proteins have been used to treat large debilitating conditions like cancer and autoimmune disease. Today they represent 30% of the total pharmaceutical market, with the top 10 generating over $5B in annual revenue each. Yet the way we discover these treatments has not changed in decades — it is still manual, based on human-led hypothesis, trial-and-error approaches, inconsistent and incomplete data. With low hanging fruits picked many years ago, R&D productivity has massively declined: today, getting just one protein to market takes more than a decade and costs over $2B dollars. …


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The Qatalog team

Working at some of the world’s most successful technology companies — Amazon and Transferwise, Tariq Rauf experienced the sprawl of SaaS tools, information fragmentation and lack of consistent context between people, teams and projects. He knew that to work better together, teams didn’t need a better documentation tool or better chat. Teams needed a compass to better navigate this jungle of apps — an infrastructure that brings all the pieces of our modern workspace together.

That’s why he founded Qatalog, an entirely new foundation for collaboration and information sharing rebuilt from the ground up to support how we really work today. …


You couldn’t make up a story about finding a multi-billion-dollar company in a garage in Europe. But that’s where MessageBird’s story began. When we first invested in the company’s Series A in 2017, the team was working out of three converted car mechanic’s garages side by side in Amsterdam. We were blown away by how founder Robert Vis had bootstrapped the business to a $100m run rate over six years before raising any outside capital. We knew they were onto something big.

A photo of the exact moment we invested in MessageBird in 2017

MessageBird was founded in 2011 amid an explosion of messaging and communications channels that are still proliferating today — from SMS to Skype, WhatsApp, WeChat, Instagram, Line, Facebook Messenger, Telegram and many more. For consumers, this revolution has radically increased choice and speed of communications with family and friends, while also reducing the cost. …


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Attentive CEO Brian Long

As we send messages back and forth on WhatsApp, Instagram, Messenger, Snapchat and LINE, we often forget the power of the mighty SMS. SMS is also often underused by marketing departments, but it’s forecast to be a key growth area in mobile marketing in the next decade. Compared to other channels, SMS has high read and response rates compared to email.

That’s why we’re excited to announce our participation in Attentive’s $230M Series D today. …


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When Niklas founded Atomico in 2006, the guiding principle of the firm was the conviction that great companies can come from anywhere. The motivation was not merely altruistic. As no single geographical region had the monopoly on transformative ideas or great talent it simply made sense to seek our great companies in more places, and specifically in Europe which had long been overlooked.

What was once a radical concept is now an accepted truth — transformational technology companies which tackle meaningful challenges, enhancing our lives and creating substantial value in the process actually do now come from anywhere and everywhere.

Is it enough? …


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The Onna team

Salim Elkhou’s first job out of college was helping companies find relevant information internally to use in government investigations or litigations. When he saw how slow and painful that could be, he founded a company in the U.S. to provide those services faster to corporate legal departments.

As Salim and his team spent project after project looking for internal intellectual property references across emails, servers, laptops and different apps to submit for court deadlines that were always too soon, he saw his customers’ frustration. They couldn’t understand why it was so hard to find information that they themselves held internally. …


It was only a few short years ago that Fabian Rusitschka, a core member of the production strategy team at Audi, found a kindred spirit in Max Stähr while undertaking an apprenticeship at the car manufacturer. Later finalising their PhD theses in a remote mountain hut, Fabian revealed that his dream in life was to revolutionise the way that cars were made, and later every other manufactured item on the planet.

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The problem Fabian saw was this: Almost every company that sells a physical product today uses a production line. The scale at which this is done is gargantuan, as manufacturing is one of the world’s biggest industries, with an annual value estimated at $8.3 trillion and a workforce of 300 million (according to Brookings). Yet these production lines haven’t changed much since Henry Ford developed the techniques of mass production in the early 20th century. …


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Sasha Astafyeva and Terese Hougaard

While our day to day job is partnering with companies led by ambitious founders, perhaps our most important investments are the ones we make in our team as we build Atomico into a venture firm for the long-term. That’s why we are excited to announce that we are strengthening our investment team with two new hires in London.

Sasha Astafyeva is joining the Atomico team as Partner to lead sourcing, due diligence, and management of Atomico’s investments with consumer companies. Originally from Ukraine, she spent three years as a Principal at Felix Capital prior to joining Atomico. …


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The last several decades of incredible technological progress we’ve witnessed have been made possible thanks to an exponential increase in computing power (the famous Moore’s Law). However, as Moore’s Law comes to an end, we fall short tackling today’s new technological frontiers — from synthetic biology to personalised healthcare or AI-driven drug discovery. Taking a classical computing approach would require exponentially higher (read: impossible) compute capability. Quantum computing breaks through these current limitations by taking a fundamentally different approach to solving the large-scale optimisation algorithms that lie at the heart of these problems.

Yet there has yet to be a consensus as to the optimal hardware type for a quantum computer. Each proposed architecture type has different scaling and quality challenges. But a team of the world’s leading quantum computing scientists from the University of Bristol and Imperial College London — Jeremy O’Brien, Terry Rudolph, Mark Thompson and Pete Shadbolt — believed they had the answer. …

About

Atomico

We partner with Europe’s most ambitious tech founders at Series A and beyond.

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