me.

Lessons of a Harvard StartUp Part 2: A Few Reflections and Tips to Myself.

Auriel Wright
Jul 22 · 2 min read

Dear Auriel,

Here is a growing list of things you have learned this summer while working on your startup full time:

I must constantly ask questions.

I must understand that when doing market research, I must constantly ask questions from what I consider to be the ideal user. And then ask questions to the non-ideal user, just for a sanity check. You have to check for false positives to keep the work kosher.

Never make assumptions.

Never make assumptions about how my ideal user should interact with my solution; I should actually consider bringing my tools in front of a variety of people and see what natural flow of thought arises when they encounter problems and attempt to use my solution. Being a technical founder, market research is something that I have been struggling with while developing my solution. So I have been finding myself stopping building and asking at least 10 people, do you like this? Do you need it? Do you care if we just built it? And then watching them use it (that is how you learn the most).

Those who learn how to bounce back from failure become the differentiated candidates for the global economy.

In the grand scheme of things, those who learn how to bounce back from failure become the differentiated candidates for the global economy. This means I should not emulate everyone’s path but follow my own and learn to navigate as I go to be a global competitor.

Do not rush into something you’re not sure about.

Do not rush into something you’re not sure about. Hearing parables of the young startup founders and their rush to execute mindless ideas that ended up falling apart this summer while working on my own company really resonated with me. From this, I realized I should spend more time expanding my network and building my expertise. I am young and should acknowledge that and look to those older to also be a beacon of information and inspiration.

Hard work and talent go hand in hand for success.

Hard work and talent go hand in hand for success. It is never too late to learn and, whether in business or in life, learning should be an ongoing process. Hearing a ton of “no’s” are a part of getting that one “yes” that will last.

The picture was taken at a Hackfest; credit goes to Chukwudi N. Kanu.

-Auriel
CEO/CTO StrattyX

Auriel Wright

Written by

Elle 瑞尔 | Cofounder of www.strattyx.com | Computer Science Student @Harvard | https://www.linkedin.com/in/auriel-wright-44346b5a/

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