Regardless of Who Wins in November, Trump Has Already Won

The Democratic party started its primary season in 2018 full of inspiration and hope. It was the most diverse field in presidential history, including the first openly gay man, four women, and three candidates of color, including two women.

It felt like a rushing optimism, in some ways reminiscent of 2008. The mood was jubilant. The 2018 midterms had been a sweep, one of the largest political wins in modern history, and the largest loss for the Republican party since the post-Nixon rout of 1974. Over a hundred women and people of color were elected up and down the ballot. The first transgender women won their races. …


The Night I Became Buffalo Bill

I had forgotten to pick up my meds. They needed refilled and I am notorious for being unable to remember basic tasks and chores of daily, normal life that others seem to have no problem managing. Something about a noxious combination of cPTSD, ADHD, and anxiety/depression. It can make you forget things. Daily living is a chore in itself.

I am, in short, a mess. But that’s okay, I tell myself, glancing with no guilt whatsoever (lie) at the cat’s litter box I need to clean out. I’m doing what I can do, when I can do it. It’s exhausting and it’s never enough to keep up. I’m not just a mess. …


By now most people who follow politics are probably familiar with the phrase “deep state.” Trump’s popularized the phrase through the influence of people like Steve Bannon, Roger Stone, and James Corsi. It should be noted that all three of these men are associated with or employed by conspiracy theorist, professional lunatic and possible performance artist Alex Jones, the latter two especially appearing regularly on Jones’s show InfoWars.

The notion of the “deep state” goes back a while and is mostly associated with the conspiracy fringe where those on the inside of the “deep state” are typically associated with the usual suspects: the Illuminati, the Freemasons, “international Jewry,” or somewhat closer to home, in the Trilateral Commission, the Council on Foreign Relations, or some other body of people that operate as an invisible government calling the shots instead of the elected government. …


In the aftermath of the 2016 election I recall many people, understandably upset and worried about Trump’s victory, justifying the intensity of their disdain for Trump by saying something like the following: “Trump is a monster. I’ve lived through a lot of Presidential administrations, Republican and Democrat. I never felt this way about W. Bush or Reagan. That’s why this is so serious.”

It was a way of expressing that disagreements with previous Republican administrations were a normal part of partisan politics, the Trump administration represented something else. Something different. An aberration, a departure from the political norm so severe that it practically required the level of outrage it generated. That this disagreement transcended partisanship and realpolitik and had entered into the arena of genuine alarm for the country. Bush II emerged after Trump’s election as a rehabilitated “elder statesman” by some in the media (“liberal” media, where art thou?), …


It occurred to me yesterday that I should briefly lay out my political position as it currently stands in some more detail than I have. I thought this would be a good idea for a couple of reasons, chief among them that readers might not know where I’m coming from, as well as the simple fact that this is what I think at this current moment in time. I’ve been all over the map when it comes to political ideology, and so to avoid confusion about my positions, I thought some clarity might be in order.

Upon realizing this, I was immediately struck by a certain nervousness about actually doing it. I was, on some level, afraid of putting my beliefs out there. The emotion, not quite fear but more than pure nervousness, surprised me, and when I interrogated this feeling I discovered it had been aroused by the thought of other leftists seeing this post and deciding I had committed the unforgivable sin of being insufficiently woke. There is a certain stereotype of, for example, Left Twitter, as being filled with doctrinaire, rigid, ideological purists who fight endlessly about terms and happily devour each other, allies, potential allies, and everyone else. They have been assigned SJWs by the rest of the internet (thanks, in large part, to 4chan and the alt-right) for their enthusiasms. …


The House of Representatives today passed the Equality Act, which would protect LGBTQ people from discrimination in housing, employment, education, federal programs, jury service, public accommodations, and credit and lending. It’s a major milestone for equality in the United States, one that has been too long in coming. (The bill was originally introduced in 2015, but has languished under Republican control).

After decades of crying about mythical persecution against conservatives, and after three years of a Republican administration that has headed efforts, led by VP Mike Pence, to enlarge the special privileges of Christians who want to discriminate against LGBTQ individuals and others, one might be forgiven for thinking that the GOP would be opposed to discrimination. If they are truly victims, they should want to end the scourge of discrimination more generally. Today’s vote makes clear the fact that “religious freedom” for Christians must come at the expense of the freedom of all others. …


Every year my small midwestern town hosts a holiday parade between Thanksgiving and Christmas. During this last one, amid the fire trucks and local business floats, I counted three churches officially present as part of the parade. As they went along the parade path, the crowd burst into applause. Volunteers from each of the churches went along the sides of parade, handing out evangelistic pamphlets. It was the first time I had dared to venture out in girl jeans, having accepted that I was transgender only two weeks before. I was given several of these pamphlets.

Inside, along with the usual fundamentalist gospel message were other messages. One claimed “secular culture” was attacking Christians. Another spoke about their persecution by liberal elites. The third spoke about “religious freedom.” It was an odd spectacle: three churches, officially recognized parts of a parade funded by our local government, greeted to applause, and allowed to hand out proselytizing literature, considered itself persecuted and discriminated against. …


I first heard about Ben Shapiro when I was still a conservative, eagerly watching every Ron Paul speech I could get my hands on. I was deep in the Young Republicans at my local college, and had traveled to Washington D.C. for the 2009 CPAC conference. I toured the historical monuments while there, almost knocked over G. Gordon Liddy in a crowded lobby, and managed to get Paul’s autograph on one of his books.

By this time Shapiro was a rising star on the right but not yet a household name. I’d read most of his books, including his first title, Brainwashed, about the supposed liberal bias at Harvard. (Ever since Buckley’s God and Man at Harvard it has been almost a conservative rite of passage to pen a work lambasting the supposed lib bias of our corporate university system.) …


The recent story involving South African track star Caster Semenya is a horrific one. A cis woman athlete at the top of her game, she is being forced to reduce the amount of naturally-occurring testosterone in her body in order to compete in women’s sports. The absurdity is on full display here, a situation in which a cis woman is being forced to reduce her natural hormone levels in order to be considered a “real” woman by the governing bodies overseeing track and field competitions.

The collision is of intersecting discrimination — racism, sexism, misogyny, and, yes, transphobia. The double standard is obvious, as Ruth Wood points out in the L. A. …


By now the Trump team’s argument about Robert Mueller’s Report is well known. “No Collusion! No Obstruction!” Although, to be fair, even Trump was forced to downgrade his “No Obstruction” claim to “Essentially No Obstruction,” which is not at all the same thing.

But with all the shrieking from conservatives and Republicans, the truth can get lost in the shuffle. I’ve spent the last few weeks working through the Mueller Report. Here’s what it actually says.

Mueller’s Methodology

Perhaps the most important aspect of determining what the Report concluded is understanding how it defines various terms. …

About

Anarcha Davis

Trans woman novelist and writer from Ohio. She/her pronouns only. A.A. in History, B.A. in English Literature

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